Violinist Nicholas DiEugenio ’08AD appointed Assistant Professor at Ithaca College

Nicholas DiEugenio, violinNicholas DiEugenio ’08AD has been appointed Assistant Professor of Violin at the Ithaca College School of Music. The position is tenure-track and begins this August.

BIOGRAPHY

Praised by the Cleveland Plain Dealer for his “invigorating, silken” playing and “mysterious atmosphere,” violinist Nicholas DiEugenio leads a versatile musical life as a multi-faceted performer of composers from Buxtehude to Carter. This year’s projects include concerts at Town Hall in Seattle and Merkin Hall in New York, as well as concerts at the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Recently, Mr. DiEugenio performed Ezra Laderman’s Violin Duets in Weill Recital Hall (Carnegie Hall) along with violinist Katie Hyun. He has premiered chamber works by composers Yevgeniy Sharlat, Matthew Barnson, and Timo Andres at Yale, as well as at Roulette in New York, and by Stephen Gorbos at Cornell. MORE

Published April 30, 2009
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From the Archives: Coolidge Quartet performs at Yale in November, 1936

Coolidge QuartetElizabeth Sprague Coolidge, a vital and prominent patron of twentieth-century American music, extended her reach to New Haven. The daughter of Yale graduate Albert Arnold Sprague (Class of 1859), she and her mother donated the funds for Yale’s first building dedicated to music, Sprague Memorial Hall, which opened in 1917. A series of chamber music performances in Sprague Hall was also named in memory of Albert Arnold Sprague. MORE

Published April 29, 2009
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Julian Pellicano ’09MM appointed to faculty at Longy

pellicano_web1Julian Pellicano ’07MM, ’09MM, currently a conducting fellow at the Yale School of Music, has been appointed the artistic director of large ensembles in the Conservatory and principal conductor of the Longy Chamber Orchestra and Longy Chamber Winds, beginning in September. Currently, Mr. Pellicano serves as the assistant conductor of the New Britain (Conn.) Symphony and has toured with New Paths, New Music, a New York-based organization promoting cultural exchange through new music. Since 2008 he has been the conductor of the Norfolk New Music Ensemble, at the Norfolk (Conn.) Chamber Music Festival.  In addition to overseeing the direction of Longy’s large ensemble program, Mr. Pellicano will teach conducting, privately and in classroom instruction, and will also serve on the Conservatory Faculty Advisory Council. MORE

Published April 28, 2009
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John Mangan ’94MM appointed Vice President & Dean of Curtis Institute of Music

john-manganJohn Mangan, a graduate of the Yale School of Music and a lecturer in the Department of History, has been appointed as the next Vice President and Dean of the Curtis Institute of Music. Dr. Mangan will oversee the academic, musical studies, and performance curricula, as well as all areas relating to students and faculty. He succeeds Robert Fitzpatrick, who retires in May after a twenty-nine-year tenure at Curtis.

According to Roberto Díaz, president and chief executive officer of Curtis, Dr. Mangan brings to Curtis broad experience in academic administration, teaching, and music performance. For the last seven years, he has held administrative and teaching posts at Yale University, most recently as assistant dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and lecturer in the Department of History. From 2002 to 2006 he worked in undergraduate academic and student affairs at Yale as dean of Jonathan Edwards College, long regarded as Yale’s music and arts residential college. Dr. Mangan holds a Ph.D. in History and Education from Columbia University. A classical guitarist with extensive performing experience, he earned a Master of Music degree from the Yale School of Music and a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. MORE

Published April 27, 2009
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Yale Cellos Gallery

Yale Cellos

View photographs of two sold-out concerts by the Yale Cellos with director and founder Aldo Parisot. The concerts, which took place at Yale and in Carnegie Hall, honored Aldo Parisot’s 50th year on the Yale School of Music faculty.
All photos by Vincent Oneppo.

Published April 24, 2009
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Yale/New Haven Young Artist Solo Competition

Winners of the 2008 Yale/New Haven Young Artist Solo Competition

Winners of the 2008 Competition

The Yale School of Music is pleased to announce the second annual Yale/New Haven Young Artists Solo Competition. The competition will be held on Saturday, May 9th, 2009, beginning at 11:00 am, at Yale University’s Sprague Memorial Hall (470 College Street, New Haven). Each New Haven K-8 school may choose up to three students to compete.  The competition is open to students in fourth through eighth grades who play percussion (not piano), strings, woodwinds, and brass. MORE

Published April 23, 2009
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YSM students successful in 2009 Koussevitzky Young Artists Awards

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Flutist Yoobin Son ’09MM won second prize and clarinetist Paul Won Jin Cho ’09MM took home third in the 2009 Koussevitzky Young Artists Awards.

Cho performed the Nielsen Clarinet Concerto, the same piece with which he recently won the Woolsey Hall Concerto Competition at Yale.

Every spring, the Musicians Club of New York holds a competition for young artists between the ages of eighteen and thirty. The categories – Voice, Piano, Strings, and Winds/Brass – are rotated annually; the 2009 category was Winds and Brass. Cash prizes and concert performances are awarded to the first, second and third prize winners, selected by juries of prominent musicians. MORE

Published April 23, 2009
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Season Finale: Yale Philharmonia plays Rachmaninoff, Strauss, Ravel

yale_philIn its final concert of the season, the Yale Philharmonia will perform three colorful and popular works from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries on Friday, May 1 at 8 pm in Woolsey Hall.

Conducting fellow Julian Pellicano will lead the orchestra in Richard Strauss’s rollicking Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, a tone poem from 1907. Then the orchestra’s music director, Shinik Hahm, will take the podium for the rest of the evening. Under his direction, Latvian pianist Reinis Zarins, a winner of the 2008 Woolsey Hall Concerto Competition, will perform the solo in Maurice Ravel’s Piano Concerto for the Left Hand.

The evening culminates in Rachmaninoff’s monumental Symphony No. 2 in E minor.

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Published April 21, 2009
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Aldo Parisot and the Yale Cellos in the news

Aldo Parisot and the Yale Cellos in rehersal in Sprague Hall

Aldo Parisot and the Yale Cellos in rehearsal

In anticipation of the Yale Cellos’ upcoming performances, a variety of newspapers have published stories about Aldo Parisot and the ensemble he founded back in 1983. Now celebrating his fiftieth year on the faculty of the Yale School of Music, Parisot leads the Yale Cellos in two concerts this week – tonight in New Haven and tomorrow in New York.

Tonight’s concert in Sprague Hall is already sold out, although a small number of tickets may be available at the door. Limited numbers of tickets are still available to tomorrow’s performance in Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall.

Read about the Yale Cellos and Aldo Parisot in:

The New York Times

The Hartford Courant

The New Haven Register

In addition, Tuesday’s concert in Carnegie Hall is listed as a Critics’ Pick in Time Out  New York and New York Magazine.

Published April 20, 2009
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Yale Institute for Music Theatre attracts media attention

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The new Yale Institute for Music Theatre has attracted a host of media coverage. The inaugural Institute will feature three selected works: Cancer? the musical, with music, book, and lyrics by Sam Wessels; Invisible Cities, with score and libretto by Christopher Cerrone (’09 MM); and POP!, with book and lyrics by Maggie-Kate Coleman and music by Anna K. Jacobs. Read more about these works in an earlier blog post here.

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Published April 20, 2009
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