[ Faculty General ]

Tokyo String Quartet to retire from international concert stage after 2012–2013 season

April 19, 2012

Tokyo String Quartet. Photo by Marco Borggreve.

The Tokyo String Quartet announced today that the concert season 2012–2013 will be its last. One of the world’s most distinguished chamber music ensembles, the quartet was founded in 1969 and joined the faculty of the Yale School of Music as Artists-in-Residence in 1977.

The Tokyo Quartet – Martin Beaver, violin; Kikuei Ikeda, violin; Kazuhide Isomura, viola; and Clive Greensmith, cello – currently performs well over one hundred concerts annually in North and South America, Europe, Australia, and Asia. They have released more than forty landmark recordings on Deutsche Grammophon, BMG/RCA Victor Red Seal, Angel-EMI, CBS Masterworks, Harmonia Mundi, and Vox Cum Laude.

The ensemble has won the Grand Prix du Disque and Best Chamber Music Recording of the Year awards from Stereo Review and Gramophone magazines, as well as seven Grammy nominations.

In announcing the quartet’s retirement from Yale and the international stage, cellist Clive Greensmith said: “It has been a humbling and extraordinary experience to be part of such an ensemble, but it is time to step away from the hectic travel schedule and allow each of us the opportunity to pursue our individual performing and teaching interests.”

Robert Blocker, Dean of the Yale School of Music, commented: “For over 35 years, the Tokyo Quartet has been an integral part of the fabric of our School. Their artistry on the concert stage is matched by their passion for the string quartet literature and their dedication to nurturing the musicians of tomorrow. We are grateful for their friendship and for their transformative contributions to the Yale School of Music.”

The Tokyo Quartet’s final concert will take place at the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, the summer home of the Yale School of Music, in June 2013.

COMMENTS ( 1 )

It’s sad hearing these masters retire as a group!

May 2nd, 2012 | charlotte