YSM now accepting applications for fall 2018 enrollment

Violinist Wynton Grant ’17MM. Photo by Matt Fried

The School of Music is now accepting applications for enrollment in fall 2018. “We have openings in all areas, including the tuba and harpsichord studios and the orchestral conducting program,” Donna Yoo, YSM’s director of admissions and alumni affairs, said. “It is unusual for us to have available spaces across all programs, and we are looking forward to welcoming new students to all areas of study.”

The Admissions Office anticipates interest in the School’s revamped B.A./M.M. program, which is now open to applications from high-school seniors. The program, Yoo said, “should appeal to students who are interested in pursuing both academic and musical excellence at an Ivy League institution.”

The School will announce available fellowship opportunities in December. These would include openings in the string quartet fellowship program and the recently launched collaborative piano program. Applications for the Morse Postgraduate Teaching Artist Fellowship will also be accepted starting in December.

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Published September 15, 2017
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Convocation 2017 defines YSM as place for “Music Among Friends”

School of Music Dean Robert Blocker often describes music as “the currency of hope” and has long championed the School’s commitment to inclusivity and diversity. That commitment was reiterated emphatically on Thursday night in his 2017 Convocation speech, “Music Among Friends,” in which he celebrated “courage, inclusivity and diversity, connectedness, tolerance and respect, and compassion.” Upon its founding, he said, “the School of Music opened wide its doors and heart to all those who brought their gifts of talent and intellectual curiosity to campus.” Today, Blocker pointed out, the School stands in solidarity with those whose place in our community hangs in the balance.

“All of us bring anxieties, concerns, and even fears about the human condition to this room tonight,” he told new and returning students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests, “for we live in a time in which human dignity and indeed humanity are being assaulted throughout the world. Nothing, I think, is as incomprehensible and unimaginable as the vengeful rescindment of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy, known as DACA. Now, these young people we call Dreamers live with fear rather than hope. This action touches our community profoundly because we are witnesses to the deep grief and stressful uncertainty these Dreamers and their families suddenly face. I do believe reasonable and compassionate leaders among us hear and feel the anguished cries of Dreamers and that they, with our encouragement and support, will find a way to keep their American dream alive.”

Connecting YSM’s values to its mission, Blocker said, “music teaches us that every voice is distinct and important, that each is necessary for harmony, and that is precisely why we know that our combined voices will help repair our troubled world.”

Following University Provost Benjamin Polak’s installation of the incoming class, whose members come from five continents, 25 countries, 26 states, and 58 institutions, Convocation attendees sang Schubert’s An die Musik (with Franz von Schober’s text, as translated by YSM faculty bass-baritone Richard Cross), as is School tradition. Blocker then delivered his remarks before introducing the faculty, alumni, and current students who performed as part of the ceremony.

Violinist Daniel S. Lee ’06MM ’08AD, a newly appointed faculty member in early music whose ensemble, The Sebastians, is in residence at the Yale Collection of Musical Instruments, performed Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber’s Sonata No. 3 in F major, C. 140 (from Sonatae, violino solo) with faculty harpsichordist Arthur Haas. Bass-baritone Dashon Burton ’11MM sang “Grosser Herr, o starker König,” from Bach’s Christmas Oratorio, BWV 248, and “Mache dich, mein Herze rein,” from the St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244, with pianist David Fung ’11MM ’13MMA ’17DMA. And violinist Sirena Huang ’19AD performed Tchaikovsky’s Valse-Scherzo, Op. 34, with pianist Lam Wong ’18MM.

The performances added punctuation to Blocker’s remarks, which concluded with him telling members of the incoming class that “here at YSM, you will experience fully the gift that is ‘Music Among Friends,’ and encouraging all in attendance, referencing a favorite story about Robert Louis Stevenson, to “take hope, and make holes in the dark with the beauty and light of your music.”

Photos by Harold Shapiro

Published September 8, 2017
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[ concerts ]

Tiam Goudarzi, recorder and Paolo Zanzu, harpsichord perform Nov. 11

paolo-zanzu-webThe Yale Collection of Musical Instruments at the Yale School of Music presents Baroque recorder player Tiam Goudarzi and harpsichordist Paolo Zanzu on Wednesday, November 11 at 5:30 pm. The program, entitled Dissertazione corelliana (Corellian dissertation), explores the rise of the Roman school of instrumental music in the 18th century.

The duo will open and close the program with two sonatas from Arcangelo Corelli’s Opus 5. The collection was originally written as a set of 12 violin sonatas; Goudarzi and Zanu will open the program with the Sonata in B-flat major, Op. 5, No. 9 and will close with the Sonata in E-flat major, Op. 5, No. 1.

Zanzu will then play three short keyboard pieces by Domenico Scarlatti: the Sonata in A major, K. 113; Sonata in A major, K. 114; and Sonata in C minor, K 115. The pair will team up again for a performance of Georg Frideric Händel’s Recorder Sonata in D minor, HWV 367, and William Babell’s “Vo’ far guerra” from the opera Rinaldo. Zanzu will perform one more work for solo harpsichord, Händel’s Harpsichord suite in B-flat major, HWV 434, before the closing Corelli work.

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Published October 27, 2015
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[ in the press ]

Yale Alumni Magazine: Celebrity harpsichord?

ycmi-harpsichordYale Alumni Magazine | Mar/Apr 1015

Some time in the late nineteenth century, an unknown antiques dealer decided that this harpsichord wasn’t glamorous enough. It’s a rare 1770 instrument by Pascal Taskin, harpsichord maker to King Louis XV and head of the most admired workshop in the history of French harpsichords. Nevertheless, it got a makeover. Taskin’s name was allowed to remain on it—but “Restored by Taskin” was added, to suggest an earlier maker. Paintings were incorporated to imply that it once belonged to Émilie du Châtelet (1706–49), an important French scholar and Voltaire’s mistress from 1733 to 1740. The woman seen here on the inside of the lid is meant to resemble her, and the chateau to her right is Cirey, where she lived with Voltaire. MORE

Published May 20, 2015
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New York Times: Plucking Notes, and Strings, of Long Ago

New York Times | By Phillip Lutz

In 1640, Andreas Ruckers of Antwerp was producing harpsichords of such clarity and consistency that they were the envy of Northern Europe. Most of those harpsichords, like others of their vintage, have disappeared or been radically altered, sometimes with disastrous results.

audio-tour-home

One that hasn’t, however, sits among the more than two dozen period keyboards on display at the Yale Collection of Musical Instruments in New Haven. Apart from the slight extension of its range in the early 18th century, the floridly adorned, single-manual instrument remains fundamentally untouched, its soundboard yielding a brilliant tone that, on a recent weekday, carried throughout the collection’s quarters, a onetime fraternity house on Hillhouse Avenue. MORE

Published March 30, 2015
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[ concerts ]

The Glorious Year 1685: Arthur Haas in recital Jan. 21

Arthur HaasThe Faculty Artist Series at the Yale School of Music presents harpsichordist Arthur Haas in a solo recital on Wednesday, January 21 at 7:30 pm.

1685 had far-reaching consequences for the history of music. Three of the most distinguished Baroque musicians and composers were born that year: Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frederic Handel, and Domenico Scarlatti. This recital will celebrate these composers’ birth year with Handel’s Suite in E Major, three sonatas by Scarlatti, and Bach’s Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue.

In addition, Haas will perform music written in or around 1685 by Henry Purcell, Bernardo Pasquini, and Jean-Henri D’Anglebert. These composers comprise the first half of the program, with Purcell’s Suite in G minor, Z. 661; three pieces in G minor by Pasquini; and D’Anglebert’s Transcriptions de Lully. MORE

Published January 15, 2015
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[ faculty ]

In memoriam: Richard Rephann, 82

Richard Rephann at the Collection of Musical Instruments

Richard Rephann at the Collection of Musical Instruments

Richard Rephann, harpsichordist and director emeritus of the Yale Collection of Musical Instruments, died peacefully at Arden Courts Memory Care Community in Hamden, Connecticut, on 29 December 2014. A victim of Alzheimer’s disease, he was 82.

The elder son of Clarence Franklin Rephann and Thelma Louise Hamill, Richard Thaddeous Rephann was born on February 9, 1932 in Frostburg, Maryland. As a teen, he attended the Johns Hopkins University Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore, where he studied piano under Mieczyslaw Munz and Alexander Sklarevsky.

His long association with Yale University began in the fall of 1961, when he became a harpsichord pupil of Ralph Kirkpatrick. Following the completion of a master’s degree in 1964, he received faculty appointments as Instructor in Harpsichord Playing in the School of Music and Assistant Curator of the Collection of (Historical) Musical Instruments. In 1968, he became Director of the Collection (a post he held for 37 years), while being appointed full Professor (Adjunct) of Organology and Harpsichord Playing in the School. MORE

Published January 9, 2015
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[ concerts ]

Arthur Haas performs harpsichord music of Jean-Philippe Rameau

Arthur Haas

The Yale School of Music’s Faculty Artist Series presents American harpsichordist Arthur Haas, a world-renowned performer and scholar of French Baroque music, in a concert of works by Jean-Philippe Rameau on Saturday, February 1st at 5 pm. The concert takes place in Morse Recital Hall, located in Sprague Hall at 470 College Street.

A member of the YSM faculty, Arthur Haas is an authority on the music of Rameau; he recently recorded the composer’s complete harpsichord works for Plectra Records. He has also been praised by Le Monde for his interpretations of French keyboard music. This concert will feature selections from Rameau’s three books of keyboard pieces (written in 1706, 1724, and 1728), as well as the standalone piece La Dauphine  (1747). MORE

Published January 28, 2014
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Arthur Haas performs keyboard music by Rameau and others May 8

Recital also includes music by Corelli, Geoffroy, and Alessandro Scarlatti

haas_arthurAmerican harpsichordist Arthur Haas, renowned worldwide for his performances of French baroque and contemporary music, will perform at the Yale Collection of Musical Instruments on Wednesday, May 8 at 5:30 pm. Haas is a member of the Yale School of Music faculty.

Titled “Oh! The Things You Will See: Rameau Goes South”, the concert will feature early works by Jean-Philippe Rameau, one of the leading French composers of his time, and follows him in his travels southward to Italy, a country represented by composers such as Alessandro Scarlatti, who was best known for his operas.

Jean-Phillipe Rameau was one of the most influential Baroque composers of the eighteenth century. He was the leading French composer of opera and harpsichord music of his time. Initially, his revolutionary use of harmony was attacked by more traditional musical consumers; by the 1750s, however, Rameau was criticised in an incident known as the “Querelle des Bouffons,” in which those who favored Italian opera viciously attacked him as an “establishment” composer.

The concert will also include an 18th-century harpsichord transcription of one of Arcangelo Corelli’s Concerti Grossi, as well as the Suite in G minor by French composer Jean-Nicolas Geoffroy. Known for his inventive harmonies, Geoffroy was author of the largest collection of harpsichord music of 17th-century France.

Admission to the performance is free, but reservations are suggested due to limited space; the public should call 203-432-0822 to reserve seats. The Yale Collection of Musical Instruments is located at 15 Hillhouse Ave, New Haven.

This concert will stream LIVE online at music.yale.edu/media.

For more information, visit yale.edu/musicalinstruments or contact the Collection of Musical Instruments at 203-432-0822. MORE

Published April 22, 2013
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Jory Vinikour brings historical keyboards to life in Oct. 16 concert

Program features French, German harpsichords

The concert season at the Yale Collection of Musical Instruments opens with a performance by harpsichordist Jory Vinikour on Sunday, October 16. Vinikour, born in the U.S. and active across Europe, will perform music by Bach, Handel, Rameau, and others on French and German harpsichords from the eighteenth century. The concert will take place at 3 pm at the Collection of Musical Instruments (15 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven).

Two harpsichords from the Collection will be featured in this recital. Music by French composers will be performed on a harpsichord made in Paris around 1740 by François Etienne Blanchet the Elder. Music by Bach, Scarlatti, and Handel will be performed on a harpsichord made in Hamburg around 1760 by Johann Adolph Hass.

Vinikour will open the program with J.S. Bach’s virtuosic Toccata in D Major, BWV 912, performing on the German harpsichord. He will then play four of Domenico Scarlatti’s compact sonatas: the Sonata in D Major, K. 535; B minor, K 87; D Major, K. 119; and D minor, K. 120. The first half will close with Handel’s Chaconne in G Major, HWV 435, a set of increasingly intricate variations.

The second half of the program turns to France: On the Parisian harpsichord, Vinikour will perform a suite of pieces in F major by Louis Couperin. The concert will conclude with Rameau’s second set of Pièces de Clavecin (harpsichord pieces), written in 1724.

The Yale Collection of Musical Instruments, one of the foremost institutions of its kind, preserves and exhibits musical instruments from antiquity to the present. Many instruments are maintained in playing condition and are featured in performances and demonstrations in the fine acoustic of the upstairs gallery.
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Published September 23, 2011
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