[ in the press ]

Alumnus Dantes Rameau and Atlanta Music Project win big on new TV show

Dantes Rameau '07 MM, left, with rapper Common

Dantes Rameau ’07 MM, left, with rapper Common

By Howard Pousner | Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Growing up in Ottawa, bassoonist Dantes Rameau was a fan of hip-hop artist Common. So Rameau knew it was an uncommon day when he answered a knock at the door during rehearsals earlier this month at the Gilbert House recreation center in southwest Atlanta only to find the musician-actor waiting with a TV crew on the porch.

In his role as a guest host on the new Fox TV show Knock Knock Live that premiered Tuesday, Common was paying a surprise visit to Rameau, co-founder and executive director of the Atlanta Music Project. Common’s mission: to lay some gifts on the Atlanta nonprofit that provides tuition-free music education to under-served youths.

“I had no idea this was going to happen until I opened the door and there was Common and a bunch of cameras in my face,” Rameau, 32, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “It took a lot of coordination and colluding and hiding by staff, board members, students and their parents. They managed to keep it a secret and lure me to be in the right place at the right time. I was really stunned.” MORE

Published July 28, 2015
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[ music in schools ]

Symposium on Music in Schools June 4–7 to focus on music partnerships

Music in Schools - All City Honors Ensemble - 5

Music in Schools Initiative

The 2015 Yale Symposium on Music in Schools will take place June 4–7 on the Yale campus. This year, the event will focus on partnerships between public school systems and private music organizations.

Thirty-eight music partnerships from across the United States were selected to participate in the event. Two representatives from each partnership will travel to New Haven to take part in the biennial event. Over the course of four days, those representatives will participate in a variety of discussions and workshops, culminating with the presentation of the Yale Distinguished Music Educator Awards at the closing banquet.

The Symposium is designed to spark ideas and provoke conversation. Workshops on topical issues in music education will be followed by breakout sessions that will allow participants to explore ideas in depth. An event on Friday, June 5 will feature the Emanio String Quartet in a combination of conversation and performance. MORE

Published June 3, 2015
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[ events ]

Symposium on Music in Schools to reward partnerships June 2015

The Music in Schools Initiative is proud to announce the 2015 Yale Symposium on Music in Schools and Yale Distinguished Music Educators Awards. This year’s Symposium will be held June 4–7, 2015 at Yale University.

This year, the focus of these two activities is on partnership programs between public school music programs and professional music organizations. With support from an endowment established by the Yale College Class of 1957, the 2015 Symposium will honor thirty-five music education partnership programs from throughout the United States for their outstanding accomplishments teaching music in public schools.

Over the course of four days, two representatives from each partnership will participate in a variety of discussions and workshops, culminating with the presentation of the Yale Distinguished Music Educator Awards at the closing banquet.  MORE

Published November 25, 2014
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[ music in schools ]

Wall St Journal: A Musical Fix for American Schools

Photo from the Music in Schools Initiative, a partnership between the Yale School of Music and New Haven Public Schools

Photo from the Music in Schools Initiative, a partnership between the Yale School of Music and New Haven Public Schools

Wall Street Journal
By Joanne Lipman

American education is in perpetual crisis. Our students are falling ever farther behind their peers in the rest of the world. Learning disabilities have reached epidemic proportions, affecting as many as one in five of our children. Illiteracy costs American businesses $80 billion a year.

Many solutions have been tried, but few have succeeded. So I propose a different approach: music training. A growing body of evidence suggests that music could trump many of the much more expensive “fixes” that we have thrown at the education system.

Plenty of outstanding achievers have attributed at least some of their success to music study. Stanford University’s Thomas Sudhof, who won the Nobel Prize in medicine last year, gave credit to his bassoon teacher. Albert Einstein, who began playing the violin at age 6, said his discovery of the theory of relativity was “the result of musical perception.” MORE

Published October 13, 2014
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[ alumni ]

Dantes Rameau ’07MM named one of Ebony Magazine’s Power 100

dantes rameau '07MMYale alumnus Dantes Rameau ’07MM was named one of Ebony Magazine’s 2013 Power 100, a list of the most influential African-Americans. Rameau, cofounder and executive director of the Atlanta Music Project, was lauded as one of the “Community Crusaders” on the list.

The winners were honored in New York this week with a Power 100 Gala at Lincoln Center. Earvin “Magic” Johnson Jr., Marcus Samuelsson, and Henry Louis Gates were among those in attendance

Mr. Rameau, a bassoonist, is an alumnus of New England Conservatory’s Sistema Fellow Program inaugural class, graduating in 2010. He As a Sistema Fellow he spent one year studying non-profit management and spent two months living and teaching in Venezuela.

The Atlanta Music Project has raised nearly one million dollars and grown programming to 150 students, 15 teaching artists and four locations. MORE

Published November 20, 2013
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[ music in schools ]

Symposium affirms diversity of music education in American public schools

symposium13-1

The 2013 Yale Symposium on Music in Schools concluded on June 8 with an affirmation of the quality and diversity of music education in the public schools of America. Fifty Yale Distinguished Music Educators, selected from over 300 nominations, from 32 states, convened in New Haven to discuss “The Role of Music in School Reform.”  A lively series of presentations culminated with a two-hour discussion amongst the teachers,  seeking their solutions to ensuring the value of music instruction as schools continue to evolve.  This discussion will be posted as an online video by the end of the summer. MORE

Published June 24, 2013
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Yale/New Haven Solo Competition announces winners

YASC-2013-088

The winners in the high school division, with the judges

The annual Yale/New Haven Young Artists Solo Competition, held May 20–22, 2013 in Morse Recital Hall, awarded prizes to nine public school music students. The competition, a collaboration between the Yale School of Music and the New Haven Public Schools, offers NHPS students the opportunity to demonstrate their skills and compete against their peers. Students are nominated by their school music teachers. The competition is part of the Music in Schools Initiative.

Each age group — 4th–6th grades, 7th–8th grades, and 9th–12th grades — competes on a different night. The two younger age groups include students who play percussion, string, brass, and woodwind instruments. The high school level of the Solo Competition is open to voice students as well as instrumentalists.

The top three performers in each age group were awarded prizes, including tickets to a future concert at the School of Music.

The participants and judges in the middle school division

The participants and judges in the middle school division

The 2013 winners of the Yale/New Haven Young Artists Solo Competition are: MORE

Published June 13, 2013
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Symposium affirms diversity of music education in American public schools

Music in Schools-572

A discussion during the 2013 Symposium on Music in Schools. More photos below.

The 2013 Yale Symposium on Music in Schools concluded on June 8 with an affirmation of the quality and diversity of music education in the public schools of America. Fifty Yale Distinguished Music Educators, selected from over 300 nominations, from 32 states, convened in New Haven to discuss “The Role of Music in School Reform.”  A lively series of presentations culminated with a two-hour discussion amongst the teachers,  seeking their solutions to ensuring the value of music instruction as schools continue to evolve.  This discussion will be posted as an online video by the end of the summer.

Anne Midgette, Classical Music Critic of the Washington Post and a 1986 graduate of Yale College, was the keynote speaker at the Awards Dinner.  She congratulated the teachers and spoke of their value to the overall infrastructure of music-making in America.  Her often-humorous (particularly related to her own musical training) but deeply insightful comments helped frame the evening in which the teachers received a certificate and recognition from Dean Robert Blocker and Associate Dean Michael Yaffe.

Another highlight of the evening was the announcement by Dean Blocker of the Dr. Reginald Mayo Teaching Artist Prize that will be awarded yearly to a Yale graduate student who exemplifies the best in serving as a Graduate Teaching Artist in the Music in Schools Initiative. Dr. Mayo, who is retiring this year as Superintendent of Schools in New Haven, has been instrumental in creating the partnership between Yale School of Music and the New Haven Public Schools.

The fifty teachers represented urban, suburban, and rural school districts, and had the opportunity to spend two full days in policy discussions led by experts in the field. View details of the program here. MORE

Published June 11, 2013
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Symposium on Music in Schools takes place this week

Event Focuses on the Role of Music in School Reform

Anne Midgette, keynote speaker

Anne Midgette ’86BA, keynote speaker

The Yale School of Music is proud to host the fourth Symposium on Music in Schools, honoring public school music educators from across the country, this week. Supported by the Yale College Class of 1957, the biennial Symposium is a core program of the Music in Schools Initiative with a national scope.

From a pool of nearly 300 nominees representing 45 states, a panel of music professionals from YSM and NHPS selected this year’s 50 Distinguished Music Educators. The selected educators hail from 32 different states. These music teachers will travel to New Haven, all expenses paid, to attend the four-day symposium.

Workshops and discussions at this year’s symposium will focus around one main theme: The Role of Music in School Reform. The issue of school reform is a potent topic throughout the country. School districts are having ongoing discussions about what young students should be learning. Often in recent years, music teachers have had to fight to keep their programs off the chopping block. This year’s Symposium aims to bring attention to the very integral role music can play in school reform.

The four-day event will open with a workshop MORE

Published June 3, 2013
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Fourth Symposium on Music in Schools to take place June 6–9, 2013

Fifty Yale Distinguished Music Educators Announced

The fourth Symposium on Music in Schools will take place at the Yale School of Music June 6–9, 2013. Supported by the Yale College Class of 1957, the Symposium is a core program of the Music in Schools Initiative honoring outstanding public school music teachers from around the United States. This biennial conference allows Music in Schools to extend its reach beyond the intensive ongoing programs with the New Haven Public Schools, onto a national level.

From a pool of nearly 300 nominees representing 45 states, a panel of music professionals from YSM and NHPS selected this year’s 50 Distinguished Music Educators. The selected educators hail from 32 different states, including the first ever Symposium attendees from Kansas and Mississippi. These music teachers will travel to New Haven, all expenses paid, from across the country to attend the four-day symposium.

Workshops and discussions at this year’s symposium will focus around one main theme: The Role of Music in School Reform. The issue of school reform is a hot topic throughout the nation. Between recent programs like the Race to the Top Fund and the Common Core State Standards, districts are in ongoing discussions about what exactly our young students should be learning. Often in recent years, music teachers have been compelled to fight to keep their programs off the chopping block. This year’s Symposium aims to bring attention to the very integral role music can play in school reform.

The four-day event will open with a workshop with Richard Deasy, former director of the Arts Education Partnership, on the history of music’s role in school reform. A panel including Scott Shuler, immediate past president of the National Association for Music Education (NAfME), will then deliberate current issues in school reform. David Myers, current director of the University of Minnesota School of Music, and Dantes Rameau ’07MM, co-founder of the Atlanta Music Project, will appear to discuss partnership programs between public schools and music organizations. The 50 teachers will be honored at an awards banquet at the conclusion of the weekend.

Yale Distinguished Music Educators 2013 MORE

Published March 14, 2013
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