Violinist Ariel Horowitz ’19MM, on broadening her horizons and playing “Ein Heldenleben”

Ariel Horowitz

Violinist Ariel Horowitz’s first performance at the School of Music was the Yale Philharmonia’s season-opening concert, which included a performance of Stravinsky’s revolutionary Rite of Spring. “It was really an amazing experience,” she said. “The second I sat down, I felt like a professional. I felt like I needed to bring my best artistry, because my colleagues were bringing theirs.”

Horowitz ’19MM, who was born in Washington, D.C., and grew up in Bloomington, Indiana, earned a bachelor of music degree from The Juilliard School, where she studied with Itzhak Perlman and Catherine Cho, before enrolling at YSM. Here, Horowitz studies with Ani Kavafian while exploring what Yale University has to offer.

Studying at YSM, she said, was an “opportunity to … develop myself as a person and an intellectual and an artist.”

In addition to playing the violin, Horowitz’s artistic practice includes composition. Her Juilliard recital featured a performance of Woman, a performance “collage” she created that includes music, dance, and the recorded voices of various women in her life. For Horowitz, art is a vehicle through which she contributes to the needs of several communities. She’s a co-founder of The Heartbeat Project, which provides music training for Navajo schoolchildren in Crownpoint, New Mexico.

Horowitz hopes that being a student at Yale will “contribute to my understanding of global politics and global affairs.”

“To just be around people who are scholars, I think, is just going to be such a unique and different experience for me,” she said.

Still, she’s here at YSM to play and study the violin. And that includes playing in the Yale Philharmonia. When the orchestra performs Strauss’ tone poem Ein Heldenleben on Friday, Oct. 13, under the direction of guest conductor David Robertson, she’ll be the concertmaster, playing the solo part.

“I have never played it in context,” Horowitz said.

Talking about Strauss’ storytelling, she said, “I almost feel like Heldenleben is more of a dramatic work” than a piece of music. The violin solo “is a depiction of [Strauss’] wife, Pauline.” Having studied and read about the piece, Horowitz said, “I feel like I have a lot of insight into how Pauline was actually feeling,” and that the composer, “whether he intended to or not, shows how much power Pauline has.”

The solo part is challenging, particularly in terms of having “enough variation in my sound to be able to express the depths of Pauline’s character. Those character changes are so important to bring that story out.”

Practicing the part, Horowitz said, “really feels like learning lines to a play. I don’t want to be Ariel when I’m playing,” she said. “I want to be Pauline.”

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Published October 5, 2017
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Vijay Gupta ’07MM, on music as a vehicle for social justice

Vijay Gupta

Violinist and YSM alum Vijay Gupta ’07MM is a member of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the founder and artistic director of Street Symphony, an organization that “serves to foster a dialogue which tells the unheard stories of the most marginalized communities in Los Angeles through the power of musical expression,” according to language on its website. We spoke with Vijay about the artist’s role in society.

Q: What experiences at Yale and the Yale School of Music, and in New Haven, inform the work you’re doing now with Street Symphony and in terms of how the arts can be a vehicle for social justice in a larger sense?

A: Well, it was two classes in particular. One was my Hearing class with Joan Panetti, which totally transformed the way that I teach and perform and collaborate. I was actually Dr. Panetti’s TA for my second whole year at YSM, so that was really, really special for me. And it’s kind of amazing, I kind of feel Dr. Panetti coming up in my voice and in my steps when I teach, so that’s very cool. The second class was a survey of late Beethoven by Markus Rathey, and he went through, I think, from Op. 90 until the end of Beethoven. And just being able to present in his class, and being able to look at the composers for who they were as people and not just as these marble busts of dead white guys, really, really changed the way that I approach playing. And it’s a direct correlation to the way that I lead programs when I play Beethoven or Schumann in a county jail, because our audiences are not interested in how well we play, they’re interested in the stories. They’re, in a sense, interested in the humanity of the composers. So those are two things that I got from those two classes. And of course I have to give credit to my amazing teacher, who was Ani Kavafian. She was just so wonderful and kind and got me to think about different aspects of my playing that I hadn’t even thought about before, but she also cared about me as a person, which was kind of new for me having come from the conservatory system. Oftentimes in those situations my personhood didn’t count as much as how well I played my etudes. But I played a lot of Baroque violin at school with ISM; I was playing with Robert Mealy and that was an extension of what I was getting from Markus Rathey’s class and from Joan Panetti’s class. It was a very natural extension of what was going on in the life of these composers as they were composing. And one direct example of how that’s showed up for me in my organization is in our Messiah project. We do a yearly sing-along of Handel’s Messiah in Skid Row at a homeless shelter. And we’ve actually now started placing formerly homeless Desert Storm combat veterans as our soloists, and we give them lessons all year long. And when you look at the situation in which Handel performed his Messiah, it wasn’t in a concert hall, it was in an orphan’s hospital, and the first concert released 142 men from debtor’s prison. So if we’re really doing authentic performance practice, if we’re really going to put our mouth where our money is with regard to what these composers were actually dreaming and thinking as they composed, then we also have to have the same kind of social understanding of what kind of music our community needs. It became very clear to me at school that these composers were writing for their communities. I’m sorry to go on a little bit here, but Bach’s passions would have been called engagement sing-along concerts today, because everybody in the audience knew those chorales and they stood up and sang them. So what’s our modern day Messiah? That’s the kind of question that I’m asking in my head right now as I lead my life and do my stuff.

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Published August 29, 2017
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Violinist and YSM alum Jessica Oddie, on music education in the United States and abroad

Jessica Oddie

Since she graduated from the Yale School of Music, violinist Jessica Oddie ’13BA ’15MM has been living in Germany, “playing chamber music of all varieties and working in educational initiatives, supported by a DAAD [German Academic Exchange Service] fellowship to research the differences between the European and American systems of music education.” We talked recently with Oddie, who was immersed in the Lincoln Center Teaching Artist Development Labs “discovering how I can deepen my teaching artistry further,” about her time at YSM and how it informed what she’s doing now.

Q: How did participating as a Teaching Artist in YSM’s Music in Schools Initiative influence what you’re doing today?

A: My time in MISI strengthened my belief that we as artists have a strong imperative to share our passion and knowledge, not only through performance but also through teaching. MISI offered me an opportunity to be involved in my community as a musician and educator, while also providing a platform to engage with ideas about art and education with colleagues, mentors, and other professionals. MISI’s commitment to creating another musical community in New Haven, and YSM’s support for innovation in that field, inspired me to continue this work when I moved to Germany, at a time when cultural exchange, multiculturalism, and how these themes influence music education are particularly important topics.

In Germany, I’ve worked in collaborations between music schools and normal schools, bringing music education to students who would not otherwise have an opportunity to try out an instrument, including students from difficult socioeconomic or refugee backgrounds. I’ve been involved in conversations at the Musikhochschule Stuttgart and the recent Germany-wide Musikschule Kongress, exploring how music education can be inclusive of new members of European society, especially through intercultural music collaboration and exchange. I started a project at a local middle school aimed at getting young string players excited about upcoming orchestral performances in the area, by arranging orchestral repertoire for players of all levels. By playing this repertoire, whether they were beginners who were pizzing open strings or advanced students playing an excerpt from the solo line of the Beethoven Violin Concerto, students got to know the pieces from the inside out.

Q: How is the work you’re doing there similar to and how is it different than what you did in New Haven as a YSM Teaching Artist?

A: My students in Germany have an enormous amount in common with my students in New Haven. Children are children, and the joy of exploring or creating something beautiful together is the same regardless of the culture. My work is therefore largely the same. One of the most important things we as teachers can do is to affirm to children the value of their experiences and the power of their creativity, and to provide them with tools to express their own voices.

The biggest difference logistically is that funding in Germany is generally from the state, so initiatives are developed in conjunction with the local government, whereas in the United States, most are developed by entrepreneurial individuals who have an idea and find the funds to make it happen.

Q: Can you share some words about the importance of programs like the Music in Schools Initiative and the one with which you’re involved now? 

A: I believe there is no task more essential to crafting a brighter future than engaging with young people about ideas, seeking and creating meaning together, and celebrating a multitude of voices. Programs like MISI inspire creativity, connect people, and strengthen communities.

Q: What would you say to incoming YSM students who might not be familiar with the Music in Schools Initiative? 

A: Absolutely get involved! You will share a lot and learn even more, from colleagues, mentors, and most of all your students. I am constantly surprised by how much I learn through teaching. I also can’t think of a more fulfilling way to spend your Saturday mornings than working with young New Haven orchestral players.

Published July 26, 2017
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YSM welcomes two artist diploma candidates to prestigious program

Sirena Huang, left, and Szymon Nehring

In the fall, the Yale School of Music will welcome two new artist diploma candidates to the program. Violinist Sirena Huang, who is currently enrolled in YSM’s master of music program, will now pursue an artist diploma. Pianist Szymon Nehring will enter the AD program having previously studied at the Academy of Music in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Huang and Nehring will join pianist Vyacheslav Gryaznov in the program, whose curriculum was revised in 2014 to serve instrumentalists and vocalists who are on the cusp of major international solo careers.

“The artist diploma is our highest performance degree,” YSM Deputy Dean Melvin Chen said. “The two entering the program in the fall exemplify the type of artist diploma candidate we are looking for — bright, inquisitive, and unique artists who are gaining recognition through top prizes in major international competitions.”

Huang, who studies with Hyo Kang, recently won the New York Concert Artists Worldwide Debut Audition for Violinists and the inaugural Elmar Oliveira International Violin Competition. Earlier this month, Nehring won the 15th Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition. He will study with Boris Berman at YSM. MORE

Published May 17, 2017
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[ students & alumni ]

Diomedes Saraza Jr. to make Carnegie Hall debut

dio_saraza10_large_2Violinist Diomedes Saraza Jr. ’17 MMA will make his Carnegie Hall debut on June 18th, 2016. Saraza will perform the Sibelius Violin Concerto with the Philippine Philharmonic Orchestra, who will also be making their Carnegie Hall debut, under the baton of Olivier Ochanine.

The concert aims to bring pride to Filipinos living in the United States, and to celebrate the Filipino spirit through music. Proceeds from the concert will be given to the Philippine Disaster Relief Corporation to assist with the organization’s housing projects. MORE

Published May 31, 2016
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[ students + alumni ]

Suliman Tekalli joins Catalyst String Quartet

Catalyst Quartet

Catalyst Quartet

The Catalyst Quartet announced in January that Suliman Tekalli ’16 AD has been named the newest member of the ensemble. He replaces Jessie Montgomery, who left to devote her time to composing.

Tekalli will rotate first and second violin parts with Karla Donehew-Perez. Winner of the 2015 Seoul International Music Competition, he brings a wealth of solo and chamber music experience to the quartet. MORE

Published February 2, 2016
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[ concerts ]

Carolyn Kuan conducts the Yale Philharmonia in Mahler and Berg Jan. 29

Carolyn Kuan

Carolyn Kuan

The Yale School of Music presents the Yale Philharmonia with guest conductor Carolyn Kuan and violin soloist Mélanie Clapiès on Friday, January 29. Kuan, the music director of the Hartford Symphony Orchestra, will lead the orchestra in works by Alban Berg and Gustav Mahler.

Violinist Mélanie Clapiès, a recent YSM graduate and a winner of the 2015 Woolsey Hall Concerto Competition, will be the featured soloist in Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto. Perhaps his most frequently performed work, Berg’s Violin Concerto is marked as “to the memory of an angel”: he was driven to write it after the death of Manon Gropius, the daughter of Alma Mahler (once Gustav Mahler’s wife) and Walter Gropius.

The second half of the concert feature Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 1, named the “Titan” after the novel by Jean Paul. “Mahler’s story took shape as a sequence of experiences,” writes Steven Johnson: “the first two movements progress from youthful springtime to confident adulthood; the last two progress from death to a battle against sorrow.”
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Published December 22, 2015
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[ alumni ]

Dennis Kim ’98 MM appointed concertmaster of Buffalo Philharmonic

Dennis Kim, violin

Dennis Kim, violin

The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra has named Dennis Kim ’98 MM as its new concertmaster. The appointment follows a week-long trial in 2014 in which Kim led a Sibelius concert and gave a recital for the orchestra. His predecessor, Michael Ludwig, left his post in the spring of 2014 to pursue a solo career.

A graduate of the Curtis Institute as well as the Yale School of Music, Dennis Kim is currently concertmaster of the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra in Finland. He has also served as concertmaster of the Hong Kong and Seoul Philharmonic Orchestras.

As guest concertmaster, he has worked with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Royal Stockholm Philharmonic, Qatar Philharmonic Orchestra, and the KBS orchestra in Seoul. MORE

Published September 11, 2015
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[ students + alumni ]

Suliman Tekalli wins second prize in Seoul International Violin Competition

Suliman Tekalli

Suliman Tekalli

Violinist Suliman Tekalli ’16 AD was awarded second prize in the Seoul International Music Competition this weekend. He shared the prize with Japanese violinist Ayana Tsuji. 

No first prize was awarded in this year’s competition, which takes place annually in South Korea. The competition rotates among violin, piano, and voice. MORE

Published March 30, 2015
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[ alumni ]

Violinist Corin Lee ’13MM joins string quartet ETHEL

lee-corinCorin Lee ’13 MM is the new violinist in the string quartet ETHEL.“I’m so blessed to be joining ETHEL. This is a natural fit for me,” said Lee in an announcement from the quartet. “I am grateful for this opportunity.”

Corin “Cory” Lee is an acoustic, electric, and baroque violinist who incorporates technology into traditional music to push the limits of how music can be performed. He has performed his “musically marvelous” (Steve Reich) electronic arrangements in prestigious venues through the United States including Carnegie Hall’s Stern Auditorium. MORE

Published March 24, 2015
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