[ in the press ]

Miro String Quartet at Yale’s Morse Recital Hall Tuesday; Boris Berman plays Brahms Wednesday

New Haven Register
By Register Staff

NEW HAVEN >> The Miro String Quartet, a widely traveled group that is now the Faculty String Quartet in Residence at the University of Texas at Austin, will play the music of Schubert, Beethoven and Dutilleux Tuesday evening in a Yale School of Music concert in Morse Recital Hall.

The 8 p.m. concert will feature Beethoven’s String Quartet in B-flat major, Op. 18, No. 6, known as “La Malinconia” for the name of the slow introduction to the third movement; “Ainsi la Nuit” (“Thus the Night”), written in 1976 by the late French composer Henri Dutilleux; Schubert’s String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, “Death and the Maiden,” a pillar of the chamber music repertoire. MORE

Published March 25, 2014
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[ in the press ]

WSHU: Leelanee Sterrett ’10 MM makes her horn sing

Sterrett-Leelanee-1WSHU
By Kate Remington

Horn virtuoso Leelanee Sterrett returns to the New Haven Symphony this week for two performances as the soloist in Richard Strauss’ Horn Concerto No. 2 in New Haven and on the Essex Winter Series.

After performing with the symphony for several seasons, Leelanee was recently appointed assistant principal horn of the New York Philharmonic. She also formed a quartet, Genghis Barbie, with fellow horn players.

Kate Remington talked with Leelanee about her career, and the fun she has performing for young musicians.

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Published March 25, 2014
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[ reviews ]

New York Times: Violin Sonatas Suffuse Lent

New York Times
By Vivien Schweitzer

The Sonata No. 10 “The Crucifixion,” by the 17th-century virtuoso violinist Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber, unfolds in a blaze of effects, beginning with slashing chords perhaps intended to depict the nailing of Jesus to the cross.

The violinist Daniel S. Lee offered a fleet-fingered, passionate interpretation of the work on Saturday at St. Ignatius of Antioch Episcopal Church on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, part of Tenet’s TENEbrae series commemorating Lent.

The 18th-century English historian Charles Burney wrote that “of all the violin players of the last century, Biber seems to have been the best, and his solos are the most difficult and most fanciful of any music I have seen of the same period.” Biber composed a large catalog of instrumental and vocal music, but is largely remembered for his violin sonatas. MORE

Published March 24, 2014
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[ in the press ]

Michael Gordon ’82 MM Goes for Broke with ‘Rushes’ for Bassoon Septet

rushesWQXR
By Brad Balliett

Why is it that so many composers are reticent to write for the bassoon? The misconception that it is clumsy, slow, liable to play out of tune? The temperamental reeds? The fact that Schoenberg omitted it from Pierrot?

Whatever the case, bassoonists everywhere can thank their lucky stars for Dana Jessen, an enterprising bassoonist who took matters into her own hands, beginning a bassoon-crowd-sourced commissioning project for major works for bassoon ensemble. The first commission went to Bang On A Can co-founder Michael Gordon, and the result, Rushes, defies expectations. MORE

Published March 24, 2014
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[ concerts ]

YSM musicians perform “Strictly Britten” April 9 at Yale Center for British Art

Benjamin Britten

Musicians from the Yale School of Music will perform “Strictly Britten” on Wednesday, April 9 at the Yale Center for British Art. Pianist Wei-Yi Yang and violist Ettore Causa, both members of the School of Music faculty, will perform with oboist Andrew Parker ’10 MM.

The concert features solo and duo works written by British composer Benjamin Britten (1913–1976) between 1936 and 1963. MORE

Published March 23, 2014
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[ in the press ]

Paul Hawkshaw talks Bruckner ahead of performance by Israel Philharmonic, Zubin Mehta

Paul HawkshawSouth Florida Classical Review
By David Fleshler

[…] Symphony No. 8, Bruckner’s last completed work in the form, is considered one of his greatest compositions. Conceived on a vast scale, with performances typically taking more than an hour and 20 minutes, the symphony has dark, organ-like sonorities, moments of shattering drama, a grave Adagio as long as an entire Mozart symphony and a blazing, thundering finale.

“He wrote it when he as absolutely at the height of his powers and at the height of his popularity,” said Paul Hawkshaw, professor of music at Yale University and author of the Bruckner section of The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. “People talk about Bruckner as being this spiritual composer, that his spirituality as a person comes out in his music, and I think in the Eighth Symphony this happens more than anywhere else. MORE

Published March 21, 2014
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[ faculty + alumni ]

David Lang, Alvin Singleton elected to American Academy of Arts and Letters

David Lang

David Lang

Composers David Lang ’83 MMA, ’89 DMA, a member of the YSM composition faculty, and Alvin Singleton ’71 MMA were recently elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Lang, who holds Carnegie Hall’s Richard and Barbara Debs Chair in Composition for the 2013–2014 season, is the winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize in Music.

Also among this year’s inductees into the American Academy are fiction writers Denis Johnson, Ha Jin, and Tobias Wolff; fiction writer-essayist Wendell Berry; photographer Robert Adams; and artists Ann Hamilton and Bill Jensen.

Cookbook author and restaurateur Alice Waters will become an American honorary member, the academy said Thursday. Foreign honorary members include composer-pianist Magnus Lindberg; novelists Haruki Murakami, Colm Toibin, and John Banville; architect Toyo Ito, and expressionist painter Leon Kossoff. MORE

Published March 21, 2014
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[ concerts ]

New Music New Haven features music by guest composer Andrew Ford April 17

andrew ford composer

The Yale School of Music presents a New Music New Haven concert on Thursday, April 17, 2014. The concert features music by the prolific Australian composer Andrew Ford, alongside new works by graduate students in the school’s composition program.

The New Music New Haven concert series showcases the talented young composers studying at the School as well as the elite faculty who nurture them. Each of the faculty composers brings a unique and modern perspective to classical music composition. This concert will include Nick DiBerardino’s world without end; selections from Reena Esmail’s Anjuman Songs and William Gardiner’s Hebbian Theory; and a work by Benjamin Wallace.

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Published March 20, 2014
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[ in the press ]

Ecstatic Music Festival: Timo Andres, Gabriel Kahane, Ted Hearne, Becca Stevens & Nathan Koci

BeccaStevensKaufman Music Center

A New Sounds Live Co-presentation hosted by WNYC’s John Schaefer

Praised for his “acute ear” (New York Times) and “stubborn nose” (New Yorker) composer and pianist Timo Andres offers a new song cycle specifically created for fellow rising-star composers and multi-instrumentalists Gabriel Kahane, Ted Hearne, Becca Stevens and Nathan Koci. A multi-movement work inspired by old fashioned American parlor songs, Andres has invented his own set of “work songs” set to texts having to do with facets of professions, jobs and labor. The song arrangements are tailored to the unique strengths of the group, with the singers joining in on guitars, keyboards, accordion and banjo. The program will also include individual work by each of the other gifted composers in the collective, all arranged for the quintet to perform together.

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Published March 19, 2014
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[ in the press ]

Composer Timo Andres goes for the beauty

Star Tribune
Britt Robson

Timo Andres is a fastidious generator of beauty. Most obviously it is musical beauty, as Andres, a composer and pianist who is not yet 30, is a prodigy who was improvising on songs at the age of 6, graduated from Juilliard and Yale, has a full plate of commissioned works, and has released two albums that have provoked comparisons to John Adams and Charles Ives.

His second record, last year’s “Home Stretch,” boldly fills in the absent left hand of Mozart’s “Coronation” Concerto and also offers up a 14-minute “Paraphrase on Themes of Brian Eno.”

It is a résumé that made Andres a logical choice to be part of Liquid Music, sponsored by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra to expand the boundaries of classical music composition and performance. On Friday and Saturday nights, he will unveil his new “Work Songs” cycle, composed for a group of handpicked fellow singer-songwriters, in the Music Room at the SPCO Center. MORE

Published March 19, 2014
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