Faculty Artist Series presents Kyung Hak Yu, Elizabeth Parisot, and Ole Akahoshi March 26

10-03-26_yu-parisot2Violin sonatas by Mozart and Franck, plus the Mendelssohn Trio in D minor

The Yale School of Music presents a Faculty Artist Recital featuring violinist Kyung Hak Yu, pianist Elizabeth Parisot, and cellist Ole Akahoshi on Friday, March 26, 2010 at 8 pm in Sprague Hall. The longstanding duo of Yu and Parisot will open with Mozart’s violin sonata in B-flat major, K. 454. The Franck violin sonata, written for the virtuoso Eugene Ysaÿe and one of the composer’s best-known works, will follow. Akahoshi, who also performs frequently with Parisot, will join for Mendelssohn’s Trio in D minor,

All three performers are graduates of the Yale School of Music as well as longtime members of the faculty. Together, they have performed the Beethoven Triple Concerto with the Yale Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Shinik Hahm.

MORE

Published March 4, 2010
Share This Comments

Ole Akahoshi and Elizabeth Parisot offer a program of Bach, Brahms, Barber, and Schnittke

akahoshi_webCellist Ole Akahoshi and pianist Elizabeth Parisot will join together in a Faculty Artist Series recital on Monday, February 1, 2010 at 8 pm in Morse Recital Hall in Sprague Hall (470 College Street, New Haven). The program will range from the baroque to the twentieth century, beginning with a Bach work and concluding with Schnittke’s first sonata for cello and piano, written in 1978. In between are works by Brahms and Barber: Brahms’s sonata in D major, Op. 78, and – to mark the 100th anniversary of Barber’s birth – his cello sonata in C minor, Op. 6, from 1932.

This recital will be streamed live from the Yale School of Music’s media site.

Admission to the performance is free. MORE

Published January 8, 2010
Share This Comments

Memorial concert to honor Jesse Levine

Event will feature spoken tributes and performances by colleagues and students

levine_v2

The Yale School of Music presents a memorial concert in honor of Jesse Levine on Sunday, February 22 at 4 pm in Battell Chapel, 300 College Street in New Haven.  In addition to spoken tributes and remembrances will be performances by Levine’s former colleagues and students. Performers from the Yale School of Music will include the Yale Cellos, conducted by Aldo Parisot; Syoko Aki, violin; Frank Morelli, bassoon; pianists Joan Panetti, and Elizabeth Parisot; and several of Professor Levine’s viola students.  Levine’s longtime colleague and musical partner, pianist Morey Ritt, will  also perform.

Admission to the memorial concert is free. For further information, please visit the School of Music web site at music.yale.edu, or call 203 432-4158.

Jesse Levine, violist, teacher, and conductor, was known for his loyalty, devotion, sense of humor, strength of convictions, and compassion. He was Professor in the Practice of Viola and Chamber Music and coordinator of the String Department at the Yale School of Music since 1983. He was principal violist of the Buffalo, Dallas, Baltimore and New Jersey symphony orchestras, and was the music director of several orchestras, including the New Britain and Norwalk symphony orchestras, Orquesta del Principado de Asturias, Chappaqua Orchestra, and the Feld Ballet. Known for his work in contemporary music, he was frequently invited to conduct the Buffalo Philharmonic in its annual North American New Music Festival and participated in the annual June-in-Buffalo Festival. In the dual role of conductor/teacher Mr. Levine conducted the National Youth Orchestra of Spain, the Youth Orchestra of Andalucia, and the Youth Orchestra of Catalonia. As a member of the Bruch Trio he recorded the music of Max Bruch, Rebecca Clarke, Jean Francaix, Gordon Jacob, and Mozart for Summit Records.

Mr. Levine previously served on the faculties of the State University of New York at Buffalo, Stony Brook and Purchase, and the Peabody Conservatory of Music. He presented master classes at conservatories and  festivals throughout Spain and France. Jesse Levine studied principally at Mannes College of the Arts. He also studied conducting with Igor Markevitch in Monaco. Early career highlights included summers as principal violist at Tanglewood, performing the Stravinsky elegy on stage with the composer (and introducing him to his mother), as well as several missions to Argentina as a cultural ambassador for the U.S. State Department. Jesse Levine is survived by his wife, Jill Pellett Levine, his sons Alexander and Josh, and his sister Lisa Nowakowski.

Published February 6, 2009
Share This Comments

Yale in NY offers piano music for four and six hands

Piano

Featuring pianists Boris Berman, Claude Frank, Elizabeth Parisot, Wei-Yi Yang

The Yale School of Music presents “One and Two Pianos, Four and Six Hands,” a fascinating program of music by Mozart, Schnittke, and Stravinsky, on Wednesday, February 4 at 8 pm in Morse Recital Hall in Sprague Memorial Hall. Eminent pianists from the School of Music include Boris Berman, Claude Frank, Elizabeth Parisot, Ilya Poletaev, Wei-Yi-Yang, and Dean Robert Blocker. Alumna Pei-Yao Wang and student Reinis Zarins will also perform. In reviews of recent Yale in New York performances, the New York Times praised Berman’s “fluency” and Yang’s “virtuosity.”

The first half of the program highlights works of Mozart, opening with the overture to The Marriage of Figaro arranged for piano six hands. This unusual transcription was created by the renowned piano pedagogue and composer Carl Czerny, who was born in 1791, the year of Mozart’s death. This is followed by Mozart’s Andante with Five Variations for Piano Duet in G major, K. 501, for piano four hands, and the Sonata for Two Pianos in D major, K. 448.

The evening’s second half opens with another novelty for six hands: the seldom-performed Homage to Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich by Alfred Schnittke. The evening ends with a masterpiece, Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring in the composer’s own transcription for piano four hands. Months before the groundbreaking Rite premiered in Paris in 1913, Stravinsky himself played this four-hand version with none other than Claude Debussy, who later remarked that the piece haunted him like “a beautiful nightmare.”

Published February 4, 2009
Share This Comments