Drs. Bowring and Monahan appointed to YSM’s academic faculty

Drs. Lynette Bowring and Seth Monahan have been appointed Assistant Professor Adjunct of Music History and Visiting Associate Professor Adjunct of Music Analysis and Musicianship, respectively, at the Yale School of Music. Both will begin teaching at YSM in the fall.

Bowring, who will teach survey courses and electives in music history at YSM, has been serving as an adjunct faculty member at The Juilliard School, teaching courses in Renaissance and Baroque music history. She has also taught at Westminster Choir College and in the Music Department at Rutgers University. Bowring specializes in the instrumental repertoire of the Italian Baroque, with secondary interests that include 20th-century music. She has contributed to a number of scholarly journals and has recently written an article on the implications of musical literacy for 17th-century instrumentalists for a forthcoming issue of Early Music. She has also co-edited an essay collection titled Music and Jewish Culture in Early Modern Italy. Bowring earned a Ph.D. in musicology from Rutgers University, a master of music degree in musicology from the University of Manchester (UK), and a bachelor of music degree from the Royal Northern College of Music (UK), where she studied violin. She continues to perform as a Baroque violinist.

Monahan will teach core courses and electives in musicianship and analysis at YSM. He previously served as Associate Professor of Music Theory and Chair of the Music Theory Department at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music. Monahan has earned widespread acclaim for his publications, lectures, and conference presentations. His research focuses on the relationships among form, narrative meaning, and interpretation, particularly in the symphonies of Gustav Mahler, the late compositional style of Richard Wagner, and other Romantic and Classical instrumental works. Monahan’s Mahler’s Symphonic Sonatas, published in 2015 by Oxford University Press, won the Society of Music Theory’s Emerging Scholar Award. He earned a bachelor of music degree in composition from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, where he also studied guitar, a master of music degree in music theory from Temple University, and a Ph.D. from Yale University.

Published July 24, 2019
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Trumpeter Kevin Cobb appointed to YSM faculty

Kevin Cobb

School of Music Dean Robert Blocker announced today that trumpeter Kevin Cobb has been appointed to the YSM faculty. Cobb will begin teaching at the School in the fall. “Kevin is a member of the American Brass Quintet and performs frequently with the New York Philharmonic,” Blocker said. “He teaches at The Juilliard School and also gives master classes throughout the country. His concert activities and discography reflect those of a renowned artist.” Cobb also holds teaching positions at New York University and SUNY Stony Brook, and at the Aspen Music Festival and School and the Colorado Summer Music Festival.

Cobb has performed with such renowned ensembles as the American Composer’s Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, New York New Music Ensemble, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra, Speculum Musicae, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, and St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, among others.

In additions to his solo recording One: American Music for Unaccompanied Trumpet (Summit Records) and those made with the American Brass Quintet, Cobb appears on recordings by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera Brass.

Cobb studied at the Interlochen Arts Academy and earned his bachelor and master of music degrees from the Curtis Institute and The Juilliard School, respectively.

He succeeds Allan Dean, who will retire at semester’s end after 30 years on the YSM faculty. “My gratitude to Allan Dean is boundless,” Blocker said.

Published March 13, 2019
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YSM appoints Boris Slutsky Visiting Professor of Piano

School of Music Dean Robert Blocker recently shared with the YSM community news that pianist Boris Slutsky will join the faculty for the 2019-2020 academic year. Below is Dean Blocker’s welcome announcement. 

As we plan for the coming 2019-2020 academic year, I am pleased to announce that Boris Slutsky will join us as the Visiting Professor in the Practice of Piano, a position currently held by Professor Peter Serkin. Professor Slutsky has served on the faculty of the Peabody Conservatory at the Johns Hopkins University since 1993.

Professor Slutsky brings to our School extraordinary experience as a teacher and performing artist. He is frequently sought-after adjudicator for international competitions, and for master classes at leading institutions throughout the world. His students regularly win prizes at national and international competitions.

At YSM, he will teach applied piano and coach chamber music. Please join me in welcoming Professor Slutsky to our School. Next fall we will have an occasion to greet him personally.

Warmest regards,

Robert Blocker
The Henry and Lucy Moses Dean of Music
Yale University

Published December 22, 2018
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YSM faculty trumpeter Allan Dean to retire

Allan Dean

Over the course of 30 years at the Yale School of Music, faculty trumpeter Allan Dean has shared with students, colleagues, and audiences alike the yield of his vast musical experience. His career has been marked as much by excellence as it has by curiosity. Today, as Dean makes plans to retire at the end of the academic year, we celebrate what he has meant to our community and to the wider musical world.

“My gratitude for his collegiality and personal friendship is boundless,” YSM Dean Robert Blocker told the School of Music community. “Allan has contributed significantly to the artistic and academic maturation of the School of Music and to the discipline of music.”

Dean has played with the most venerated brass ensembles, including the New York Brass Quintet, of which he was a member for nearly two decades, as well as the American Brass Quintet, Summit Brass, St. Louis Brass Quintet, and Yale Brass Trio, alongside faculty hornist William Purvis and faculty trombonist Scott Hartman. For more than 20 years in New York City, Dean performed and recorded extensively, appearing on dozens of major-label releases of repertoire from early music to contemporary works.

A founding member of Calliope: A Renaissance Band and the New York Cornet and Sacbut Ensemble, Dean’s exploration of early music and period instruments has included performances with the Waverly Consort and the Smithsonian Chamber Players.

“This is a profoundly sad moment for me, but also an extraordinarily inspiring moment,” Purvis wrote on Facebook. “Allan has pursued a remarkably independent life in music that has epitomized curiosity and excellence in every aspect, every corner of music, to an extent that continues to inspire and instruct me on a daily basis.”

As a teacher, Dean has mentored musicians at such respected institutions as Indiana University, the Manhattan School of Music, and the Eastman School of Music. He has also taught and performed at festivals in the United States and abroad including the Spoleto and Casals festivals, and the Yale Summer School of Music/Norfolk Chamber Music Festival. Trumpeter and Yale School of Music alumna Jean Laurenz ’13MM ’14AD said that Dean, “more than anything, created an environment of camaraderie that allowed each of our individual artistic voices to flourish.”

Dean arrived at YSM in 1988, succeeding longtime faculty trumpeter Robert Nagel Jr., with whom Dean worked in the New York Brass Quintet. In that respect, Dean continued a legacy at Yale while bringing his unique personality to his work. Dean has “transformed the lives of his students, his colleagues, and indeed those fortunate enough to have heard his performances on stage and through recordings,” Blocker said.

Allan Dean’s next concert at Yale will be with his colleagues in the Yale Brass Trio. A date for that performance will be announced soon.

Published October 12, 2018
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YSM appoints Peter Serkin Visiting Professor of Piano

Peter Serkin. Photo by Regina Touhey Serkin

School of Music Dean Robert Blocker recently shared with the YSM community news that pianist Peter Serkin will join the faculty for the 2018-2019 academic year. Below is Dean Blocker’s enthusiastic announcement. 

I am very pleased to announce the appointment of Peter Serkin as Visiting Professor of Piano for the 2018-2019 academic year. A pianist of prodigious gifts and insights, Mr. Serkin began concertizing with America’s renowned orchestras and conductors at age 12, and his internationally celebrated career in the ensuing years has taken him to all corners of the globe. We are fortunate that his calendar permits him to be at Yale during our search for a senior piano professor.

Peter Serkin began his musical studies at the Curtis Institute of Music, where his teachers included the Polish pianist Mieczyslaw Horszowski and the American virtuoso Lee Luvisi, as well as his father, Rudolf Serkin. He graduated in 1965 and the next year, at age 19, was the recipient of the Grammy Award in the Most Promising New Classical Recording Artist category (the award category later named Best New Classical Artist). Three of his recordings have earned Grammy nominations (one of them features six Mozart concerti, and the other two feature the music of Olivier Messiaen) along with other awards. Serkin was the first pianist to receive the Premio Internazionale Musicale Chigiana award, and in 2001, the New England Conservatory presented him with an honorary doctorate degree.

His extensive repertoire and discography reflect a commitment to and advocacy of the music of our time. Along with his musical and intellectual insights into the work of J.S. Bach (four recordings of the “Goldberg” Variations – the first at age 18), Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Chopin, and Dvorak, he has also explored the music of such composers as Reger, Berg, Webern, Schoenberg, Messiaen, Takemitsu, Oliver Knussen, Peter Lieberson, Stefan Wolpe, Elliott Carter, and Charles Wuorinen.

Among prominent virtuosi, Peter Serkin was one of the first to experiment with period fortepianos, and the first to record late Beethoven sonatas on modern pianos and instruments of Beethoven’s era. He has collaborated with Yo-Yo Ma, Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, Pamela Frank, Andras Schiff, the Budapest Quartet, the Guarneri Quartet, and many other leading artists and orchestras. He is a founding member of TASHI (known later as the Tashi Quartet) and records for a variety of labels.

Mr. Serkin teaches master classes throughout the world and has taught at such leading institutions as the Curtis Institute of Music and The Juilliard School. He presently teaches at the Bard College Conservatory of Music. I am delighted that he will join Professor Boris Berman and the YSM piano faculty as a mentor and teacher to our gifted piano students. We look forward to the artistic and intellectual contributions Peter will make to the School of Music and to Yale in the year ahead.

Warmest regards,
Robert Blocker
The Henry and Lucy Moses Dean of Music
Yale School of Music

Published March 13, 2018
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[ in the press ]

YaleNews: School of Music launches ‘Music and Social Action’ Coursera course

ruth_sebastian-h-webYaleNews | By Bess Connolly Martell

The Yale School of Music launched its first massive open online course (MOOC), titled “Music and Social Action,” on Yale’s Coursera platform Feb. 22. Taught by Sebastian Ruth, the Yale College Class of 1957 Visiting Professor of Community Engagement, the course explores questions about musicians’ responses to the condition of the world.

The course, which took 13 months to develop, is being offered in an “on demand” format, and as such does not have to be viewed sequentially. “This process has deepened my own understanding of this material and has presented an interesting challenge to think through what makes compelling learning online,” says Ruth. “We hope we have crafted a learning experience that is rich and three dimensional.”

MORE

Published February 24, 2016
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Paul Hawkshaw to retire as Director of Norfolk Chamber Music Festival

Music Shed at the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival

Music Shed at the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival

Robert Blocker, Dean of the Yale School of Music, announced today that the School of Music and the Yale Summer School of Music/Norfolk Chamber Music Festival will have a major leadership transition in 2016. Paul Hawkshaw, who has served as the festival’s director since 2004, will retire after the 2016 season. Melvin Chen, Deputy Dean of the Yale School of Music, has been appointed as Hawkshaw’s successor.

Under Hawkshaw’s leadership, the program has flourished. Audiences perennially flock to the bucolic setting, with ticket sales continuing to grow even while other classical music organizations around the world suffer from declining attendance. Ambitious restoration projects are ensuring that Norfolk’s buildings will endure: Whitehouse has been restored to its former beauty after its recovery from devastating water damage, and the first phase of the Music Shed restoration has provided a new roof, siding, and a beautifully reconstructed cupola atop the 1906 acoustic gem.

“Paul Hawkshaw has been a transformative and visionary leader for the Norfolk program,” noted Dean Blocker. “Perhaps even most significant is the warmth with which Hawkshaw has established close relationships between the festival and the surrounding community.” The Hartford Courant has hailed the “unity between the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival and the town where the Yale program is located.… these days there’s plenty of outreach by the Yale Summer School of Music and the Yale Summer School of Art on the estate.” In that same article, Hawkshaw noted the “symbiotic relationship” between the festival and the town. MORE

Published January 15, 2016
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[ announcements ]

Robert Blocker reappointed as Dean of Yale School of Music

blockerUniversity President Peter Salovey announced recently that Robert Blocker will be reappointed to a fifth term as the Henry and Lucy Moses Dean of Music. The new five-year term will be effective July 1, 2016.

In a message to the University community, Salovey wrote: “This renewal is a reflection of Dean Blocker’s record as a transformative leader who has advanced the school—and the university more broadly—in significant ways. As dean, he has galvanized philanthropic support for music at Yale including the landmark gift that made the school tuition free; set new standards of educational excellence by recruiting world-class members of the faculty; and led our efforts to renovate and develop the school’s facilities—projects that will have impact on generations of musicians to come.” MORE

Published September 11, 2015
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[ in the press ]

New York Times notes passing of Ezra Laderman

laderman-bwNew York Times | By Margalit Fox

Ezra Laderman, an American composer who became widely known for his 1993 opera, “Marilyn,” which chronicled the waning days of Marilyn Monroe, died on Saturday at his home in New Haven. He was 90.

His death was announced by the Yale School of Music, where he was an emeritus professor and a former dean.

Mr. Laderman was a prolific composer of symphonic, chamber and vocal music, as well as a bevy of works for traditionally neglected instruments like the viola and the bassoon. But on account of its subject matter, it was “Marilyn,” commissioned to honor the 50th anniversary of the New York City Opera, that made him known to the general public. MORE

Published March 5, 2015
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[ alumni ]

Yehudi Wyner elected president of Academy of Arts & Letters

Yehudi Wyner

Yehudi Wyner

Yehudi Wyner ’50BA, ’52MusB, ’53MusM has been elected president of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He succeeds architect Henry N. Cobb and will serve a three-year term.

In his comments, Wyner said he reacted to the news of his election with “Surprise, astonishment, disbelief, and finally delight.” He was inducted into the prestigious, 250-member organization in 1999 and has served on its award juries and board of directors.

Wyner, who won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for his piano concerto Chiavi in mano, has written over 100 works, ranging from liturgical services to theater music to orchestra pieces. He is also a solo pianist and chamber musician and, since 1968, the keyboard player for the Bach Aria Group. MORE

Published February 28, 2015
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