[ in the press ]

Grunge Meets Classical: Gleb Kanasevich ’13 MM

New Haven Independent
By Lucy Gellman

Gleb Kanasevich is a man of many talents. The extraordinary clarinet player of the local group Cantata Profana, he is also the master organizer of an exciting and ambitious new CD, Refractions Vol. 2. A collaborative venture that fuses referential strains of electronic, industrial, grind, grunge and more, the CD offers a glimpse into the lives of several Yale-trained musicians after Yale, and a pursuit that has reunited them.

Refractions Vol. 1 was more concert-art oriented.” Kanasevich explained in a recent interview about the new CD. “I think this one … I don’t want to call it crossover, but maybe more referential. And more modern because of the surplus of information, of art, of different styles of music that we have right now. It’s really fun to have pieces that are referential to things we hear.” MORE

Published February 28, 2014
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New Haven Independent: Underperformed No More

cantataprofanaNew Haven Independent
By Lucy Gellman

As mezzo-soprano Annie Rosen launched fearlessly into “Malorous qu’o uno fenno” (wretched is he who has a wife), a grin that fell just short of laughter spread from her face to her bare feet, rooted firmly in the floor.

Behind her, members of Cantata Profana joined the arrangement, swinging and swaying wildly to the words as if their instruments were mere – and necessary – extensions of their bodies. MORE

Published February 24, 2014
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New Haven Independent: “Rite” On Time

New Haven Independent
By Robert Heltzl

Spring brings with it birth, creation, change, and a sense of renewal. In Igor Stravinsky’s legendary work, “Rite of Spring,” all such sentiments are undoubtedly present, but his creation is accompanied with the sublime horror and forceful sense of composition that only a master artist can summon. When it debuted in Paris 100 years ago, the piece spawned a riot, to boot.

What a pleasure then that our city could behold RiteNow: A Centennial Celebration of Igor Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring”, a powerful tribute in which eight modern composers rendered the original piece in new form, with conducting by the graceful virtuoso Paolo Bartolameolli, the same man who commissioned this updated wonder to begin with. MORE

Published November 19, 2013
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Zephyrus Project Orchestra’s RiteNow Set for this Sunday

Broadway World
Classical Music Desk

On Sunday November 17th at 8pm, conductor Paolo Bortolameolli will lead the 90-piece Zephyrus Project Orchestra in a performance of RiteNow: A Centennial Celebration of Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. This one-time-only performance will take place at Woolsey Hall, 500 College Street (corner of College & Grove), New Haven, CT. Admission is free. Complete info is here.

RiteNow will include works by composers Fay Kueen Wang, Justin Tierney, Matthew Welch, Benjamin Wallace, Daniel Schlosberg, Gleb Kanasevich, Polina Nazaykinskaya, and Paul Kerekes. Production designer Solomon Weisbard will create an immersive environmental design, and costumes will be created by Ksenia Zhuleva. MORE

Published November 14, 2013
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NH Register: 8 composers’ take on Stravinsky’s ‘Rite of Spring’ in Yale’s Woolsey Hall

New Haven Register

By Donna Doherty

NEW HAVEN >> One hundred years ago, the riot in the streets that greeted the Paris premiere of Igor Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring” ushered in a work now considered to be one of the most important pieces of 20th-century music.

It’s safe to say that there won’t be any rioting outside Woolsey Hall on Nov. 17 at 8 p.m., when the 85-member Zephyrus Project Orchestra pays tribute to the work with its only performance of “RiteNow: A Centennial Celebration of Igor Stravinsky’s ‘The Rite of Spring.’” Admission is free. MORE

Published November 12, 2013
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Concert features music of the Russian Thaw April 7

Note: This concert was originally scheduled for February 10 and was postponed due to the blizzard.

Boris Berman

Boris Berman, professor of piano at the Yale School of Music, will perform music from the “Russian Thaw” the evening of Sunday, April 7. The Thaw was a period of relative liberalization of Soviet cultural policies in the 1960s, and Berman, born in Soviet Russia, belonged to a small group of Moscow musicians that premiered pieces by young, nonconformist composers of the era.

Berman will discuss his work with figures such as Alfred Schnittke, Edison Denisov, Valentin Silvestrov, Tigran Mansurian, and Arvo Pärt, and will join with students from the Yale School of Music to perform selections from the composers’ music.

The program opens with two pieces by Edison Denisov: Ode for clarinet, percussion, and piano, and Three Pieces for cello and piano. Two pieces by Valentin Silvestrov will follow: the solo piano piece Elegy, and Postludium for cello and piano. The first half concludes with two pieces by Arvo Pärt, For Aleena for piano and Fratres for violin and piano.

The second half will open with Tigran Mansurian’s Testament for cello and piano. The program will conclude with two pieces by Alfred Schnittke: the Piano Sonata No. 2, and the Serenade for the unusual quintet of clarinet, violin, double bass, piano, and percussion.

Several YSM students will perform alongside Berman: clarinetist Gleb Kanasevich, violinist Shawn Moore, cellist James Kim, double bassist Gregory Vartian-Foss, and percussionists Garret Arney and Mari Yoshinaga.

The program takes place at 8 pm in Morse Recital Hall (470 College St., corner of Wall Street). Admission is free. Click HERE to join the event on Facebook.For more information, contact the Yale School of Music concert office at 203 432-4158. MORE

Published March 19, 2013
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POSTPONED: Boris Berman performs music of the “Russian Thaw” and beyond Feb. 10

Update 2/10/2013: This concert has been postponed because of snow.

Lecture-recital includes music by Denisov, Pärt, Schnittke, and more

Boris BermanBoris Berman, professor of piano at the Yale School of Music, will perform music from the “Russian Thaw” the evening of Sunday, February 10. The Thaw was a period of relative liberalization of Soviet cultural policies in the 1960s, and Berman, born in Soviet Russia, belonged to a small group of Moscow musicians that premiered pieces by young, nonconformist composers of the era.

Berman will discuss his work with figures such as Alfred Schnittke, Edison Denisov, Valentin Silvestrov, Tigran Mansurian, and Arvo Pärt, and will join with students from the Yale School of Music to perform selections from the composers’ music.

The program opens with two pieces by Edison Denisov: Ode for clarinet, percussion, and piano, and Three Pieces for cello and piano. Two pieces by Valentin Silvestrov will follow: the solo piano piece Elegy, and Postludium for cello and piano. The first half concludes with two pieces by Arvo Pärt, For Aleena for piano and Fratres for violin and piano.

The second half will open with Tigran Mansurian’s Testament for cello and piano. The program will conclude with two pieces by Alfred Schnittke: the Piano Sonata No. 2 and the Serenade for the unusual quintet of clarinet, violin, double bass, piano, and percussion.

Performing alongside Berman will be clarinetist Gleb Kanasevich, violinist Shawn Moore, cellist James Kim, double bassist Gregory Vartian-Foss, and percussionists Garret Arney and Mari Yoshinaga.

The program takes place at 8 pm in Morse Recital Hall (470 College St., corner of Wall Street). Admission is free. Click HERE to join the event on Facebook. MORE

Published February 1, 2013
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YSM students participate in YSD’s Sunday in the Park with George

“Anything you do, let it come from you, then it will be new. Give us more to see.”

Students from the Yale School of Drama, Yale School of Music, and Yale College join forces in the School of Drama’s production of Sunday in the Park with George. Dan Schlosberg ’13MM has orchestrated the score and served as music director, and several additional School of Music students are performing in the orchestra.

Sunday in the Park with George features music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. This production is directed by Ethan Heard. Performances take place December 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, and 20 at 8 pm at the University Theatre (222 York Street, New Haven). Tickets are available here.

School of Music students and alumni playing in the orchestra are flutists Anouvong Liensavanh and Ginevra Petrucci; clarinetists Ashley Smith and Gleb Kanasevich; violinist Victor Fournelle-Blain; violist Colin Brookes; and percussionist Jonathan Allen.

In 1884, George Seurat painted a masterpiece by holding fast to his personal vision and disregarding everything (and everybody) else. Celebrated as a genius today, he died alone, without having ever sold a single canvas. A century later, another artist named George is adrift, despite great success. Accomplished and desired, he’s lost touch with his inspiration—why, he wonders, does he make art at all? In today’s culture of success and celebrity, Sondheim and Lapine’s landmark musical poses a fundamental question about the “art of making art”: how can an artist both stay true to himself and share his vision with the world?

Students from the Yale School of Drama, Yale School of Music, and Yale College join forces to bring this Pulitzer Prize-winning musical to life. With lush, new orchestrations performed by a nine-piece orchestra, this production embodies the agony and ecstasy of making art.

Published December 10, 2012
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