Yale composers win New Music USA grants

 

More than two dozen student, alumni, and faculty composers from the Yale School of Music have received grants from New Music USA for a variety of commissions, projects, and performances. This year, New Music USA has helped fund 114 projects with grants totaling more than $500,000. Please join us in congratulating the following members of our composition community.

Students

Gabrielle Herbst ’20MM is a part of a project titled “The Female Gaze” through which works featuring the female voice are commissioned and performed. A twist on the trope of the “male gaze,” the project’s composers, performers, and intended audience members are all women. Herbst’s First Lady of the Air was inspired by the life of Amelia Earhart.

Joel Thompson ’20MMA received a commission from the Grant Park Music Festival’s FestivalNext initiative, part of Chicago’s Night Out in the Parks program, which brings classical performances into Chicago neighborhoods. Thompson’s string quartet will be performed by fellows from the festival’s Project Inclusionprofessional development program, which serves young musicians of historically underrepresented identities.

Liliya Ugay ’16MM ’22DMA was a Fellow at the CULTIVATE 2018 Emerging Composers’ Institute, which was created by the Music from Copland House ensemble. The program commissioned Ugay and other fellows to write pieces that were later workshopped, performed, and recorded.

Alumni

The Los Angeles-based Kaleidoscope Chamber Orchestra will commission 20 composers, with commissioned works to be performed in the 2020 season as part of the organization’s 20×2020 series. Of those composers, eight are YSM alumni or faculty: Andy Akiho ’11MM, Krists Auznieks ’16MM ’22DMA, Christopher Cerrone ’09MM ’10MMA ’14DMA, Natalie Dietterich ’16MM ’17MMA, Ted Hearne ’08MM ’09MMA ’14DMA, Hannah Lash ’12AD, Peter Shin ’20MMA, and Sarah Kirkland Snider ’05MM ’06AD.

Works by Reena Esmail ’11MM and Caroline Shaw ’07MM will be performed by the multi-genre string quartet Brooklyn Rider as part of the ensemble’s “Healing Modes” program in April 2020 at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the University of Maryland. “Healing Modes” was inspired by the idea that music is a force for healing.

The composing-performing group Invisible Anatomy, including Ian Gottlieb ’15MM, Paul Kerekes ’12MM ’14MMA ’19DMA, Brendon Randall-Myers ’14MM, Ben Wallace ’14MM ’21DMA, and Fay Wang ’10MM ’12AD, presented Illumination as part of the 2019 Tribeca New Music Festival. The performance combined music and performance art and was based on the role of light in human life.

Molly Joyce ’17MM was one of the composers commissioned in 2016 by Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble as part of its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Parks System. A CD of the commissioned works will be released on Innova Recordings. Joyce also received a grant for her project “Breaking and Entering,” which examines physical immobility in dance and music.

Works by Molly Joyce ’17MM, Loren Loiacono ’10BA ’12MM, and Tanner Porter ’19MM were performed as part of “Sing Out, Justice!” a program presented by the Albany Symphony’s 2019 American Music Festival. The festival commemorated the anniversaries of the passage of the 19th Amendment and the Stonewall riots.

Caroline Mallonee ’00MM will have her String Tunes recorded by the Buffalo Chamber Players, for whom she is the composer-in-residence. String Tunes  consists of 12 solos, two trios, one duo, and one quartet.

Marc Mellits ’91MM will be commissioned to write for the Chicago Opera Theater as part of Ear Taxi 2020, the second Chicago Festival of New Music put on by New Music Chicago. The festival’s mission is to support Chicago-based composers, artists, and performers by connecting them with cultural institutions.

Matthew Welch ’13MMA ’17DMA collaborated with five other composers to create the opera Chunky in Heat, which premiered this summer as part of Experiments in Opera’s 2018-2019 residency at the Flea Theater in New York City. Welch is a co-founder of Experiments in Opera.

Faculty

Faculty composer Martin Bresnick will be commissioned by the PRISM Quartet for its performance and recording project “Mending Wall,” which explores the role of walls in today’s society. Bresnick’s piece is based on the 1914 Robert Frost poem of the same name.

Faculty composer Christopher Theofanidis ’94MMA ’97DMA will write a piece for the Allentown Symphony Orchestra for its celebration of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, in 2020. The work, for strings and harpsichord, will examine themes of conservation and environmentalism.

Published July 11, 2019
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Alumni duo New Morse Code receives grant from Chamber Music America

New Morse Code

New Morse Code

The cello/percussion duo New Morse Code has been awarded a 2014 Classical Commissioning Grant from Chamber Music America. The duo — made up of percussionist Michael Compitello ’09MM, ’12MMA and cellist Hannah Collins ’08MM, ’09AD — will work with composer Christopher Stark on a new piece for cello, percussion, and electronics.

The grant will support the creation of this new piece, which will be premiered in the 2015–2016 season. Called The Language of Landscapes, Stark’s composition will leverage the unique sonic terrain of cello and percussion—transforming real and imagined landscapes into compelling musical spaces.

The journey created in the piece will begin with Michael’s Southwest desert home, traveling through the deciduous hills of upstate New York (Hannah’s home) and finally towards the wide sky of Christopher’s northern Rockies.

MORE

Published October 1, 2014
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Keri McCarthy ’00MM Receives Fulbright

Keri McCarthy headshotKeri E. McCarthy ’00MM, Assistant Professor of Oboe and Music History at Washington State University, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to lecture and research at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand during the 2011-2012 academic year. The grant was announced by the United States Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

McCarthy will study relationships between Thai traditional and art musics. Her project includes commissioning three new pieces for oboe duo from Thai composers Weerachat Premananda, AnoThai Nitibhon, and Siraseth Pantura-Umporn. Keri will perform the works in concert this summer with oboists from Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines. She will also teach oboe and American music history at Chulalongkorn University, one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in Thailand.

This Fulbright continues McCarthy’s research into musics of Southeast Asia. In 2008 she received a WSU New Faculty Seed Grant, which funded commissions for new works from four prominent Southeast-Asian composers, and performances of those works and masterclasses in Bangkok (Thailand), Hanoi (Vietnam), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), and Singapore.

Published June 1, 2011
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Markus Rathey receives Scheide Research Grant

Markus Rathey, an associate professor of music history at the School of Music and the Institute of Sacred Music as well as the Music Department, is the recipient of the William H. Scheide Research Grant for 2011.

The William H. Scheide Research Grant, awarded once every two years to a member of the American Bach Society, provides support for a research project on Bach or figures in his circle. The grant will enable Rathey to spend a month in Germany this summer to continue his research on Bach’s Christmas Oratorio. Rathey will examine Bach’s autograph score of the oratorio in the German National Library in Berlin as well as further sources in Leipzig.

Rathey studied musicology, Protestant theology, and German philology in Bethel and Münster. He taught at the University of Mainz and the University of Leipzig and was a research fellow at the Bach-Archiv, Leipzig, before joining the Yale faculty in 2003. His research interests are music of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries, Johann Sebastian Bach, and the relationship among music, religion, and politics during the Enlightenment. Recent publications include the books Johann Rudolph Ahle (1625–1673): Lebensweg und Schaffen (Eisenach, 1999), an edition of Johann Georg Ahle’s Music Theoretical Writings (Hildesheim, 2007, 2nd edition 2008), and Kommunikation und Diskurs: Die Bürgerkapitänsmusiken Carl Philipp Emanuel Bachs (Hildesheim, 2009). He was guest editor of a volume of the German journal Musik und Kirche (2005) on church music in the United States. He has contributed numerous articles to Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart, the Laaber Lexikon der Kirchenmusik, and to the handbook for the new German Hymnal (Liederkunde zum Evangelischen Gesangbuch). Professor Rathey is president of the Forum on Music and Christian Scholarship and serves on the editorial board of the Bach Journal of the Riemenschneider Bach Society. Ph.D., Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster.

Published January 6, 2011
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Dantes Rameau ’07MM receives $25,000 AOL grant

Rameau and classmate Robert Gupta, violin, upon their graduation from the Yale School of Music

AOL Inc., as part of its 25th anniversary “Project on Creativity,” announced 25 grants of $25,000 each for creative work. The winners, including Dantes Rameau ’07MM, were chosen from over 9,000 applicants. The judges included Adam Weinberg, director of the Whitney Museum of American Art; entrepreneur Andy Spade; and Tim Armstrong, Chief Executive Officer of AOL.

Born in Ottawa, Canada to Cameroonian and Haitian parents, bassoonist Dantes Rameau is the co-founder and executive director of the Atlanta Music Project. Rameau’s grant money will help him to further develop the Atlanta Music Project’s recently launched pilot program.

Following performance studies in bassoon at McGill University, Yale University, and Carnegie Mellon University, Rameau was an inaugural member of the Abreu Fellows Program at the New England Conservatory of Music, where he studied El Sistema, the Venezuelan National Youth Orchestra System. Modeled on El Sistema, the Atlanta Music Project is a five-day-a-week, after-school, youth orchestra program targeting Atlanta’s underserved communities. The Atlanta Music Project believes the pursuance of excellence in music studies leads to positive social change for its participants and the communities it serves.

Read about the grants in Bloomberg HERE.

Read Rameau’s blog HERE.

Published December 9, 2010
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2010-11 alumniVentures winners announced

Sarita Kwok, chair, alumniVentures committee

Dean Robert Blocker recently announced the 2010 alumniVentures awards, the grants that the Yale School of Music offers to its alumni for projects that follow the simple criterion: to advance the cause of music.

In thanking the alumni committee that recommended the recipients, the Dean acknowledged their work and the identification of outstanding projects that truly advance the cause of music. Sarita Kwok, chair of the alumniVentures selection committee, joined the Dean in thanking the committee members for their service to the Yale School of Music and its alumni. The committee members this year were David Kurtz, Richard Lalli, Emily Payne Veletzos, and Robert Weirich.

The largest grant this year went to Kelly Dehnert ’86MM, to support the only university-level band program in Malawi. The African country of 15 million people has only two university-level music programs, one of those at the African Bible College (ABC). These students are primarily underprivileged with limited opportunity to develop musical skills. Yet almost half of the student body at ABC is involved in the school’s music programs, including music theory, appreciation, keyboard, jazz, traditional African combos, bands, and choirs. Funds will be used to build new practice facilities for the band and provide for instrument repair.

Another substantial grant went to Dantes Rameau ’07MM to support the Atlanta Music Project. The year‐round, 5‐day‐a‐week, after‐school youth orchestra program targets at‐risk youth from grades 1 through 12, and is modeled on Venezuela’s El Sistema program. Students are provided with instruments, instruction, classes, and performance opportunities.

View the complete list of 2010-11 winners HERE.

Published November 23, 2010
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Sō Percussion receives grant from Chamber Music America

Faculty composer Aaron Jay Kernis among those commissioned by CMA grant recipients

so percussionChamber Music America (CMA) announced today that it will award $181,500 in grants for ten commissioning projects in six states. The commissions, made through CMA’s Classical Commissioning Program, are funded by a generous multi-year grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Since its creation in 1982, the CMA Commissioning Program has made more than 100 grants. Works that have been funded include Yale faculty member Aaron Jay Kernis’s Pulitzer Prize–winning Quartet No. 2 (“Musica Instrumentalis”); George Tsontakis’s String Quartet No. 4 (“Beneath Thy Tenderness of Heart”), recipient of the Kennedy Center Friedheim Award; Joan Tower’s Night Fields; Richard Danielpour’s  Urban Dances; and Steve Mackey’s  Indigenous Instruments.

Among the grant recipients is the ensemble Sō Percussion, whose membes – Eric Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting – are all graduates of the Yale School of Music. The quartet has commissioned Steve Mackey to compose an extensive work for percussion quartet. MORE

Published June 16, 2009
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alumniVentures to “advance the cause of music”

Yale School of Music supports alumni projects with grants totaling $100,000

In June, 2008, Dean Robert Blocker of the Yale School of Music announced alumniVentures, a bold and innovative program that will provide $100,000 in grants to the School’s alumni. In the first year of what Dean Blocker promised to be an annual program, alumniVentures grants would be given to projects that best followed one simple but transcendent criterion: to advance the cause of music. Three hundred proposals from 329 alumni (there were several joint proposals) were submitted, including commissions, travel to support teaching and scholarship, recital performances, recording projects, and outreach. The number of responses was remarkable, considering that the Yale School of Music, a small graduate professional school, has just over three thousand alumni. On November 10, the grants were announced. MORE

Published January 20, 2009
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