YSM presents complete Beethoven piano concertos in 2013–14 season

This post was updated Sep. 8 to reflect changes in programming.

beethoven

The Yale School of Music will present the complete cycle of Beethoven’s concertos for piano and orchestra over four concerts in the 2013–14 season. Each concerto will be performed by a different member of the Yale faculty.

The Beethoven Concerto Project begins on September 20, when Boris Berman performs the Concerto No. 5 in E-flat major on a program that also celebrates the 100th anniversary of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring.

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Published August 30, 2013
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Hung-Kuan Chen performs Brahms, Schumann & more Nov. 28

Hung-Kuan Chen

The Horowitz Piano Series at the Yale School of Music presents a recital by the pianist Hung-Kuan Chen on Wednesday, November 28. Chen, a faculty member hailed by the Boston Globe as “a deeply probing, imaginative player with an enormous palette of tone colors,” will perform a program of music featuring masterpieces from the Classical and Baroque periods.

This concert will open with two pieces by Mozart. The Fragment of a Suite in C major, K. 399 recalls the operatic overtures of the French Baroque with its slow opening followed by vivacious counterpoint. The lively spirit is followed by another Baroque reference, A Little Gigue in G Major, K. 574.

The first half closes with Schumann’s masterful Fantasie in C major, Op. 17.

Brahms’s Six Piano Pieces, Op. 118 will open the second half of the concert. This late work is sometimes thought to reflect the composer’s emotional state after the deaths of his sister Elise and close friend Elizabeth von Herzogenberg.

Chen will conclude the recital with Stravinsky’s Three Movements from Petrushka, arranged for piano from the composer’s 1911 ballet.

The concert takes place at 8 pm in Morse Recital Hall, located in Sprague Hall at 470 College Street (corner of Wall Street), New Haven. The Horowitz Piano Series is directed by Boris Berman. MORE

Published November 13, 2012
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Hung-Kuan Chen performs the “Hammerklavier” and other Beethoven sonatas Feb. 8

The Horowitz Piano Series at the Yale School of Music presents a recital by the pianist Hung-Kuan Chen on Wednesday, February 8. Chen, hailed as “a deeply probing, imaginative player with an enormous palette of tone colors” (Boston Globe), will perform an all-Beethoven program.

This recital will feature three of Beethoven’s sonatas: Nos. 27, 28, and 29. The Sonata No. 27 in E minor, Op. 90, was written in 1814 (toward the end of Beethoven’s middle period). Beethoven described its restless first movement as “a contest between the head and the heart.”

Beethoven had become almost completely deaf by the time he wrote the Sonata No. 28 in A major, Op. 101, two years later. The sonata, which Beethoven described as “a series of impressions and reveries,” is considered the first of his late-period sonatas.

The concert will columinate in Beethoven’s monumental Sonata No. 29 in B-flat major, Op. 106. Known as the “Hammerklavier,” it is widely viewed as one of the composer’s most important works – and one of the most difficult.

This concert takes place at 8 pm in Sprague Hall (470 College St., corner of Wall Street). The Horowitz Piano Series is directed by Boris Berman. MORE

Published January 17, 2012
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Pianist Hung-Kuan Chen, visiting faculty at Yale School of Music, performs Chopin, Liszt, Ravel, Scriabin December 1

“This man plays music with uncommon understanding and the instrument with uncommon imagination.”
– Richard Dyer, Boston Globe

The Horowitz Piano Series at the Yale School of Music presents Hung-Kuan Chen in a recital on Wednesday, December 1, 2010 at 8 pm in Sprague Hall. Chen, who is a visiting professor of piano at the School of Music this year, has been acclaimed by the Boston Globe as “a virtuoso… a deeply probing, imaginative player with an enormous palette of tone colors.” His sense of color will be particularly apt for the Romantic and post-Romantic repertoire on his program: Chopin‘s Deux Nocturnes, Op. 62; Ravel‘s vivid, fiendishly difficult Gaspard de la Nuit; Scriabin‘s even more virtuosic Sonata No. 5 in F-sharp, Op. 53; and Liszt‘s masterful Sonata in B minor, S. 178.

The Scriabin sonata has been described as the most difficult piece in the piano repertory by no less an artist than Sviatoslav Richter. The epigraph to the piece reads, “I summon you to life, hidden longings! You, drowned in the dark depths of the creative spirit, you fearful embryos of life, I bring you daring!” MORE

Published November 5, 2010
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