“Neuro Pianist” Eitan Globerson to give cross-disciplinary lecture

Eitan Globerson

On Oct. 8, the Yale School of Music’s Piano Department will welcome back pianist, conductor, and brain-sciences scholar Eitan Globerson, also known as the “Neuro Pianist.” Globerson was a visiting professor at Yale in 2015 and taught “Piano Pedagogy” and “The Musical Brain, from Signal to Cognition.”

Globerson’s Oct. 8 lecture, “Music, Brain, and Emotion: Unraveling the Enigma,” will explore brain mechanisms underlying emotion processing, highlighting the role of these mechanisms in perceiving emotions in music. As part of the talk, Globerson will discuss practical insights, demonstrating how our knowledge of the human brain may affect both interpretation and composition.

Globerson is Professor of Piano and Conducting at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance. As an active concert pianist, he has won both national and international prizes in performance, appeared as a soloist with symphony orchestras in Israel and around the world, and given frequent recitals and chamber music concerts in Israel, Europe, the United States, and the Far East. In addition to his musical activities, Globerson, who holds a Ph.D. in brain sciences from Bar Ilan University, is also active in scientific research. His papers on such topics as music perception, prosody in the general population and in adults with autistic spectrum disorders, psychoacoustics, birdsong, and motor control have been published in scientific journals.

Eitan Globerson will present “Music, Brain and Emotion: Unraveling the Enigma” on Monday, Oct. 8, at 4 p.m., in Sudler Recital Hall. The event is free and open to the public. 

Published October 4, 2018
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Sir Jonathan Mills to host public lectures at Yale

Sir Jonathan Mills. Photo by Seamus McGarvey

Sir Jonathan Mills will present a series of three public lectures that will collectively address issues related to “The Role of Culture in the Contemporary World.” Mills, who is known for his directorship, from 2006 until 2014, of the internationally celebrated Edinburgh International Festival, has also led prestigious festivals in his native Australia and is recognized around the world for his thought-provoking compositions. Mills holds a bachelor of music degree in composition from the University of Sydney and a master of architecture from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. He was appointed Officer of the Order of Australia in 2011 and knighted in 2013. All lectures are free and open to the Yale community.

 

Tuesday, October 2

“Culture and the Gift Economy”

Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, General Motors Room

11:30 a.m. – Buffet Lunch, Noon – Lecture

Register at jacksonlecture100218.eventbrite.com

In a world that seems addicted to measuring every aspect of human activity in terms that are almost exclusively economic, what role can there be for culture? How can the impact of the arts be measured? Are alternative types of value systems required to help explain the importance and worth of culture?

Beginning with the origins of the Edinburgh International Festival, Jonathan Mills, the Festival’s former director, explores the role an arts festival plays in building social and economic confidence at a time of financial hardship and mistrust, in a wide-ranging lecture that touches on the groundbreaking work of anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski and the idea of a “gift economy.”

 

Monday, October 15

“Music and the Sacred Dimensions of Time”

Institute of Sacred Music, Great Hall

409 Prospect St. (Divinity Quandrangle)

4 p.m., reception to follow

Drawing on sacred and secular musical examples from Josquin, Beethoven, Messiaen, and Boulez, the writings of philosopher Henri Bergson, and the poetry of T.S. Eliot, composer Jonathan Mills argues that music has a unique capacity to enable us to experience time as a heightened and emotional phenomenon — and, further, that it may itself become timeless.

 

Monday, October 22

“Culture and Well-being: Connections Between Health and Music”

Yale School of Public Health, 47 College St., Room 106

4 p.m., reception to follow

How can culture contribute to the health and well-being of human society? The sustainable provision of health care is of vital concern for governments around the world. A growing body of neurological and clinical research indicates that participation in cultural activity offers long-lasting benefits for a range of medical conditions. How can the social and economic benefits of the arts be understood and implemented by policy makers, commercial medical insurers, and clinical practitioners? How can the arts improve health outcomes for traditionally marginalized or neglected communities?

Published September 27, 2018
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Sir Jonathan Mills to host public lectures at Yale

Sir Jonathan Mills. Photo by Seamus McGarvey

Sir Jonathan Mills, Trumbull Fellow, will present a series of four public lectures that will collectively address issues related to “Culture, Creativity, and Community.” Mills, who is known for his directorship, from 2006 until 2014, of the internationally celebrated Edinburgh International Festival, has also led prestigious festivals in his native Australia and is recognized around the world for his thought-provoking compositions. Mills holds a bachelor of music degree in composition from the University of Sydney and a master of architecture from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. He was appointed Officer of the Order of Australia in 2011 and knighted in 2013. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Tuesday, September 26
“A Potted History of Festivals and Festival Making”
4:30 p.m., Sudler Recital Hall, William L. Harkness Hall

As you read this brief description, chances are several new festivals will have been inaugurated, somewhere in the world. But are such events genuine? Do they achieve that special mixture of substance and serendipity, so essential to the intriguing, immersive idea of a festival? What do we even mean when we use the word? Using the festival as a model for social and artistic engagement, Jonathan Mills explores aspects of the complex relationships between ritual and place, habit and space, that throughout history have come to define an illusive, fragile, universal though diverse phenomenon – a festival.

Thursday, October 5
“A State of the Arts”
The case for cosmopolitanism – putting culture at the center of multiculturalism
5 p.m., Whitney Humanities Center, Auditorium

We live in a world that faces huge challenges: exploding population growth, diminishing natural resources, vanishing indigenous cultures, increasing tribalism and bitter localized feuds, human dislocation of unprecedented dimensions, large-scale suffering from easily preventable or treatable diseases. It is increasingly evident that we will not be able to rationalize or legislate, let alone engineer, our way beyond our current predicaments. Culture is a prism through which to perceive the equilibrium of any society. The value of the arts has an inestimable impact on not only the vibrancy of the world we create, but also on the ways in which such challenges might be addressed.  Jonathan Mills explores ways in which one might conceive of a central role for an engagement with culture as an essential element of understanding, imagining, and realizing our social and economic well-being.

Monday, October 9
“Artists and Communities – Performing the City”
6:30 p.m., Paul Rudolph Hall, Yale School of Architecture, Hastings Hall (basement level) 

“Just as places are sensed, senses are placed” – Maurice Merleau Ponty

How do we respond to the intimate details of our surroundings? Our homes, or streets? Our neighborhoods and offices? Our urban, or, decreasingly, our rural environments? Driving through a city, a town, a neighborhood, even within speed limits, how much do we really notice? Are the textures and assemblages of buildings and streetscapes, landmarks and landscapes, ever more than fleeting glances? Are we doing anything other than passing through? Do we truly inhabit or celebrate the places in which we work, love, or play? What kind of sensory relationships exist within these familiar places? Do we perform, through ritual or reverie, consciously or intuitively, simple acts of recognition to reflect upon and evoke the places in which we live  and how those places and spaces transform over time? Jonathan Mills explores the idea of performance as a way in which we might want to inhabit and reimagine our place in the world.

Watch this lecture live, online here.

Tuesday, October 24
Improvisation and Leadership”
5 p.m., Evans Hall, Yale School of Management, Room 4410

How stable or predictable is our world? Can we truly know what the future holds for any of us? Are we in control of our lives or livelihoods? Or is life nothing more than a great big improvisation? The very word “improvisation” conjures images of mellow musicians spontaneously sparking off one another in remarkable and ingenious ways.  The idea of improvisation is much more than a musical phenomenon. In so many ways, and in a wide variety of professional circumstances, at some stage in our careers, we are all called upon to improvise. How we choose to respond to such moments can define our personal, professional, and ethical achievements. Drawing on a range of personal experiences, Jonathan Mills proposes to develop a repertoire of improvisational scenarios and link them to the insights of leadership.

Published September 15, 2017
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Ivo Josipovic, President of Croatia, to lecture on music and politics Sep. 22

PRH_foto-smIvo Josipović, the president of Croatia, will give a talk titled “Music and Politics” on Monday, September 22. The talk, which begins at 12:30 pm, will be held in Sudler Hall (in W.L. Harkness Hall, 100 Wall Street). The lecture will be followed by a question-and-answer period.

Josipović studied both music and law; he holds a degree in composition from the Zagreb Academy of Music, and has taught harmony at the academy in addition to teaching law at the University of Zagreb.  For several years, he was the director of Music Biennale Zagreb, one of the largest contemporary music festivals, and served as Secretary-General of the Croatian Composers’ Society.

He has composed some 50 compositions for various ensembles (symphony orchestra, chamber orchestra, soloists) that are performed by eminent artists, and his music has been published and recorded. Josipović is the recipient of a number of Croatian and international artistic prizes and awards, among them the Grand Prix of the European Broadcasting Union and two Porin Croatian Record Awards.

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Published September 16, 2014
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Willie Ruff to give a lecture on the American Jazz Century Sep. 4

Willie Ruff

Willie Ruff

Professor Willie Ruff will give the Martin A. Ryerson Lecture at the Yale Art Gallery on Thursday, September 4 at 5:30 pm. His multimedia presentation is titled “A Cinematic Excursion through the American Jazz Century.”

Ruff, Professor of Music and Director of the Ellington Fellowship at Yale, will highlight the life of jazz bassist Milt Hinton, delving into the history of jazz at Yale and beyond. MORE

Published September 3, 2014
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Lecture: The Art Song Compositions of Huang Tzu, Sep. 11

huang-tzu

The Irving S. Gilmore Music Library and the Yale School of Music are honored to welcome Professor Lin Zai Hong, Head of the Shanghai Conservatory of Music, and Professor Qian Ren Ping, Professor of Music Theory, along with their colleagues, to the Yale campus September 10–12, 2014.

The highlight of the visit will be a lecture presented by Professor Qian on “The Art Song Compositions of Huang Tzu” and will include performances of some of his art songs. A reception in the SML Memorabilia Room will follow. The lecture takes place Thursday, September 11 at 10 am in the Sterling Memorial Library’s lecture hall. MORE

Published August 29, 2014
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William Halpin gives lecture on wind bands Oct. 8

Dr. William Halpin will present a lecture on the roots of the modern wind band on Tuesday, October 8 at 5 pm. The lecture will take place in Hendrie Hall, Room 301.

The full title of the lecture is, “The Roots of the Modern Wind Band in the Operas Orchestras of Mozart.” Professor Emeritus at the Dublin [Ireland] Institute of Technology’s College of Music, Dr. Halpin launches his East Coast lecture series on the precedents of the modern wind orchestra in the opera orchestras of W.A. Mozart. He will be speaking to the Yale Concert Band, which will be performing excerpts from Mozart’s Gran Partita, K. 371, in November.

Yale School of Music students are welcome to attend.

Published October 7, 2013
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Symposium with conductor James Conlon Oct. 16

james_conlon,_credit_dan_steinberg_for_la_opera_4The Yale School of Music presents a symposium on “Reading and Hearing Classical Music: A Conductor’s View” with renowned conductor James Conlon on Wednesday, October 16.

The event opens with a talk by Conlon, which is followed by an open conversation between Conlon and Robert Blocker, Dean of the Yale School of Music. Parts of his talk will focus on music of Benjamin Britten, in honor of the centennial of Britten’s birth this year. Conlon will also take questions from the audience.

The event takes place from 4:00–5:30 pm in Morse Recital Hall, located in Sprague Hall at 470 College Street, New Haven. Admission is free, and no tickets are required.

The symposium will also stream live on the School of Music’s website. LIVE STREAM MORE

Published October 3, 2013
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Mario Aschauer lectures on equal temperament April 24

mario aschauerOn April 24, 2013 at 4 pm, Mario Aschauer will present a lecture called, “Has Equal Temperament Really Ruined Harmony?” The event takes place in Hendrie Hall, Room 205. Aschauer is a postdoctoral fellow at the Yale School of Music pursuing research for a book on Anton Bruckner’s compositional procedures.

Has equal temperament really ruined harmony, as R. Duffin’s Book of 2007 suggests? And if yes: how? This lecture will provide the theoretical and acoustical basics necessary to understand the fundamental problem of keyboard tuning and the manifold solutions theorists and musicians have come up with throughout the last four centuries of music history. There will also be a chance to listen to a harpsichord piece played in several historical temperaments.

Austrian scholar-performer Mario Aschauer has concertized extensively as a harpsichordist throughout Europe. His dissertation on German Keyboard Treatises in the Second Half of the 18th Century was published by Bärenreiter Verlag, Kassel, in 2011. For recent new editions of Schubert’s Moments Musicaux, Impromptus, and Late Piano Pieces, Mario developed fingerings and provided notes on performance practice. He received his training as a conductor, musicologist, and harpsichordist from conservatories and universities in Linz, Salzburg and Vienna.

This event is presented by the piano department of the Yale School of Music.

Published April 24, 2013
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Wei-Yi Yang, Karen von Kunes explore Czech music and literature April 1

Wei-Yi Yang, a member of the School of Music faculty, and Karen von Kunes, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, will present “Leoš Janáček & Milan Kundera: a confluence of Czech music and literature” on Monday, April 1.

Yang will perform Janáček’s rarely-played piano cycle On an Overgrown Path, written 1900–1912, alongside two of Dvořák’s Slavonic Dances for piano four hands. In the Dvořák he will be joined by pianists Xuerong Zhao and Miki Sawada, both students in the School of Music.

The event takes place at 7:30 pm at Berkeley College on the Yale campus. Contact the Berkeley master’s office (203-432-0501) for details.

This is the third and final interdisciplinary project that Wei-Yi Yang has undertaken this concert season. For more information on Karen von Kunes, click here. MORE

Published March 14, 2013
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