Masaaki Suzuki honored by American Bach Society

Masaaki Suzuki. Photo by Marco Borggreve

During its biennial meeting and conference, which was held at Yale University in late April, the American Bach Society awarded Masaaki Suzuki, an artist-in-residence at the Yale Institute of Sacred Music and principal guest conductor of the Yale Schola Cantorum, an honorary membership “for his accomplishments as a performer and champion of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach,” society President Markus Rathey said.

“Masaaki Suzuki has had an impact on the performance of Baroque music not only in this country but all over the world,” Rathey, the Robert S. Tangeman Professor in the Practice of Music History at the Yale School of Music, said. “As a conductor, harpsichordist, and organist, Suzuki has been one of the most prolific performers of Bach’s music for more than two decades.”

During the conference, Suzuki led Yale alumni in a performance of Bach’s B-minor Mass.

 

Published May 7, 2018
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East Coast premiere of new Aaron Jay Kernis symphony

Yale presents the East Coast premiere of Aaron Jay Kernis’s major new work, the “profoundly spiritual” Symphony of Meditations

Kernis, Aaron JayThe Yale School of Music, Institute of Sacred Music, and Glee Club will present the East Coast premiere of Aaron Jay Kernis’s Symphony of Meditations, a major new work in the repertoire for orchestra and chorus, on Friday, November 6 at 8 pm in Woolsey Hall. Kernis himself will conduct the performance, which will feature the Yale Philharmonia (Shinik Hahm, conductor), the Yale Camerata (Marguerite L. Brooks, conductor), the Yale Schola Cantorum (Masaaki Suzuki, director), and the Yale Glee Club (Jeffrey Douma, director). The vocal soloists, all emerging artists in the Yale Opera program, are Amanda Hall, soprano, Joseph Mikolaj, tenor and David Pershall, baritone. The performance will take place during the 2009 convention of the American Collegiate Choral Organization, hosted by Yale University.

The hour-long, three-movement Symphony of Meditations was commissioned by the Seattle Symphony Orchestra. After its first performance in June under the baton of Gerard Schwartz, the piece was warmly received by the audience and hailed by the press. The Examiner called it “a complex, ambitious and, overall, brilliant undertaking… there is much to praise about this multi-textured, profoundly spiritual composition.” Gathering Note said, “Kernis has constructed a major new symphony that gives notice to everyone that the form is not dead …nothing less than a serious and worthy composition.” MORE

Published October 21, 2009
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Nicholas McGegan: “Celebration of Four Masters”

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Nicholas McGegan, acclaimed by The New Yorker as “an expert in eighteenth-century style,” will conduct choral and orchestral works of Joseph Haydn, Felix Mendelssohn, and George Frideric Handel on Sunday, March 1, 2009 at 4 pm in Woolsey Hall. The concert is a “Celebration of Four Masters”— a reference to McGegan and the three featured composers — and coincides with the 250th anniversary of Handel’s death and the 200th anniversary of both Mendelssohn’s birth and Haydn’s death. McGegan will conduct the Yale Philharmonia (Shinik Hahm, director) and Yale Collegium Players (Robert Mealy, director) in Haydn’s Symphony No. 103 “Drum Roll,” and a selection of works for chorus and orchestra: Haydn’s Te Deum in C and Der Sturm with the Yale Camerata (Marguerite Brooks, conductor); Mendelssohn’s Verleih uns Frieden and Hear My Prayer with the Yale Glee Club (Jeffrey Douma, director); Haydn’s Salve Regina with the Yale Voxtet (James Taylor, director); and Handel’s As Pants the Hart and Te Deum in A with the Yale Schola Cantorum (Simon Carrington, director). The program concludes with the combined choruses and instrumentalists in Handel’s “Hallelujah” Chorus from Messiah.

The concert is a presentation of the Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Yale School of Music, and the Yale Glee Club. Admission is free. For more information, visit music.yale.edu, www.yale.edu/ism, or call 203-432-4158.

Acclaimed by the Glasgow Herald as “a wizard who can make music soar in apparent defiance of gravity,” Nicholas McGegan has been the Music Director of San Francisco’s Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra (PBO) for more than twenty years and since 1991 the Artistic Director of Germany’s International Handel-Festival at Gottingen. Mr. McGegan is an active recording artist, with an extensive discography with the PBO and other performing groups, including the Gottingen Festival Opera and Orchestra and the Arcadian Academy. Mr. McGegan’s world-premiere recording of Handel’s Susanna earned a Gramophone Award. His most recent recordings include music by Handel and Mendelssohn for Carus, Romanza, featuring works of Hummel, Lachner and Weber, and Handel’s Atalanta and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, both with PBO.  Born in England and educated at Cambridge and Oxford Universities, Mr. McGegan has an honorary degree from London’s Royal College of Music and was elected an Honorary Professor of Philosophy at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen in 2006.

Published February 2, 2009
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