[ in the press ]

Review: Yale in New York, ‘The Soldier’s Tale’ @ Carnegie’s Zankel Hall

Classicalite
By Jon Sobel

With the centenary of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring safely behind us, there’s value in a reminder of the great variety of music the composer brought out through his long career before and after the Rite‘s riotous 1913 premiere. Yale in New York brought an enchanting new production of the dance-theater piece The Soldier’s Tale to Carnegie Hall’s downstairs hall last night, featuring Michael Cerveris in the key role of the Narrator and Yale drama students in the dancing/speaking roles.

Based on a Russian folk tale, and written in response to the dislocations of World War One, the work premiered in 1918 with text by C. F. Ramuz. With a bouncy, sometimes Seussian new translation by director Liz Diamond, the Yale production showed how accessible and amusing Stravinsky’s music could be–even before the 1920s ushered in what’s generally considered his “neoclassical” style. MORE

Published April 8, 2014
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[ in the press ]

Yale School of Music, Yale School of Drama present Stravinsky’s ‘Soldier’s Tale’

cerverisNew Haven Register
By Joe Amarante

NEW HAVEN » Igor Stravinsky’s darkly comic “The Soldier’s Tale” is a real standard, says David Shifrin, artistic director of Yale in New York concert series. But a new version, to be performed Tuesday at Yale’s Morse Recital Hall and April 6 at Carnegie Hall, promises to be something pretty special.

“It’s very rarely done in the way that reflects its original traveling, theatrical, musical troupe beginnings,” Shifrin said in a phone chat Tuesday from a Vancouver, B.C., hotel room where he was on a Lincoln Center tour. “I’ve played this so many times in my career, but never in a production with this kind of depth.” MORE

Published March 28, 2014
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[ concerts ]

Yale School of Music, School of Drama present a fresh take on Stravinsky’s “The Soldier’s Tale”

Michael-Cerveris2

The Yale in New York concert series, under the artistic direction of David Shifrin, presents a new collaboration between the Yale School of Music and Yale School of Drama: a fully-staged original production and new translation of Igor Stravinsky’s darkly comic The Soldier’s Tale. Performances will take place Tuesday, April 1 at 8 pm in Morse Recital Hall on the Yale campus (details), and Sunday, April 6 at 7:30 pm in Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

This production marks one of the largest collaborations between the Yale School of Music and Yale School of Drama. It brings together School of Music faculty and student musicians with the School of Drama faculty, student, and alumni designers, actors, and technicians.

Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale (L’histoire du Soldat) was written in response to the events of World War I, and premiered in 1918. Marking one hundred years since the outbreak of the war, the Schools of Music and Drama bring a fresh perspective to the work with a lively new translation by Liz Diamond, OBIE Award winning Resident Director at Yale Repertory Theatre and Chair of the Directing Department at Yale School of Drama. Diamond will also stage the production. MORE

Published February 26, 2014
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YSM students participate in YSD’s Sunday in the Park with George

“Anything you do, let it come from you, then it will be new. Give us more to see.”

Students from the Yale School of Drama, Yale School of Music, and Yale College join forces in the School of Drama’s production of Sunday in the Park with George. Dan Schlosberg ’13MM has orchestrated the score and served as music director, and several additional School of Music students are performing in the orchestra.

Sunday in the Park with George features music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. This production is directed by Ethan Heard. Performances take place December 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, and 20 at 8 pm at the University Theatre (222 York Street, New Haven). Tickets are available here.

School of Music students and alumni playing in the orchestra are flutists Anouvong Liensavanh and Ginevra Petrucci; clarinetists Ashley Smith and Gleb Kanasevich; violinist Victor Fournelle-Blain; violist Colin Brookes; and percussionist Jonathan Allen.

In 1884, George Seurat painted a masterpiece by holding fast to his personal vision and disregarding everything (and everybody) else. Celebrated as a genius today, he died alone, without having ever sold a single canvas. A century later, another artist named George is adrift, despite great success. Accomplished and desired, he’s lost touch with his inspiration—why, he wonders, does he make art at all? In today’s culture of success and celebrity, Sondheim and Lapine’s landmark musical poses a fundamental question about the “art of making art”: how can an artist both stay true to himself and share his vision with the world?

Students from the Yale School of Drama, Yale School of Music, and Yale College join forces to bring this Pulitzer Prize-winning musical to life. With lush, new orchestrations performed by a nine-piece orchestra, this production embodies the agony and ecstasy of making art.

Published December 10, 2012
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Yale Institute for Music Theater announces 2011 dates, guidelines

Two-week workshops to take place June 6-20, 2011
Applications accepted now through Jan. 10, 2011

The Yale Institute for Music Theater (Mark Brokaw, Artistic Director; Beth Morrison, Producer) will select three original music theatre works to receive two-week workshops in New Haven June 6-20, 2011. Submissions will be accepted November 1, 2010 through January 10, 2011.

Established by Yale School of Drama (James Bundy, Dean) and Yale School of Music (Robert Blocker, Dean), the Yale Institute for Music Theater seeks to identify distinctive and original book musical, opera, and experimental/non-traditional music theatre works by emerging composers and writers, and match them with collaborators such as directors, music directors, and actors/singers who can help them further develop their work. By limiting production resources and values, the workshop will keep the focus on the creative process of the artistic team.

The selections for the inaugural Yale Institute for Music Theater in June 2009 were the book musicals sam i was with book, music, and lyrics by Sam Wessels, and POP! with book and lyrics by Maggie-Kate Coleman and music by Anna K. Jacobs; and the opera Invisible Cities with score and libretto by Christopher Cerrone. In 2010, The Daughters, with music and libretto by Shaina Taub; and Stuck Elevator, with music by Byron Au Yong and libretto by Aaron Jafferis, were workshopped. MORE

Published November 9, 2010
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Three works selected for the Yale Institute for Music Theatre

CerroneYale School Of Music student Christopher Cerrone ’09 MM is among the writers and composers who will take part in the first Yale Institute For Music Theatre, June 7-21, 2009.

The Yale Institute for Music Theatre – Mark Brokaw, Artistic Director; Beth Morrison, Producer – announces the three original music theatre works to receive two-week workshops in New Haven this June. The works are:

Cancer? the musical, with music, book, and lyrics by Sam Wessels;
Invisible Cities
, with score and libretto by Christopher Cerrone (’09 MM); and
POP!
, with book and lyrics by Maggie-Kate Coleman and music by Anna K. Jacobs.

Cancer? the musical
Music, Book, and Lyrics by Sam Wessels

About to graduate from college, intrepid Sam had a lot in front of him.  He had an acting career to start, musicals to produce, and the mysteries of adulthood waiting to uncover.  Then for a graduation gift, he got leukemia.  Cancer? the musical is an ingenious,  funny, heartfelt, and unsentimental depiction of Sam’s roller-coaster ride through the first dizzying nine months of his diagnosis and treatment—and how the cure ended up transforming his life long after the cancer itself was gone.
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Published March 9, 2009
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