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Stephanie Venturino

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Stephanie Venturino
Assistant Professor, Adjunct, of Music Analysis and Musicianship Yale School of Music
At YSM Since: 2022
“I want each student to embrace the relevance of analysis and musicianship for every aspect of music-making. My classrooms are spaces for creative exploration, places where practical, technical, historical, and cultural understandings of music freely and deliberately mix.”

Stephanie Venturino

“I want each student to embrace the relevance of analysis and musicianship for every aspect of music-making. My classrooms are spaces for creative exploration, places where practical, technical, historical, and cultural understandings of music freely and deliberately mix.”

Stephanie Venturino’s research focuses on 20th- and 21st-century French music, the history of music theory, and music theory and aural skills pedagogy. She has contributed scholarship to the peer-reviewed journal Theoria: Historical Aspects of Music Theory (forthcoming) and the edited collections Debussy Studies 2 (forthcoming, Cambridge University Press) and Arabesque without End: Across Music and the Arts, from Faust to Shahrazad (Routledge). She regularly presents her research at leading professional conferences in the United States and abroad.

Equally at home on the concert stage, Venturino has extensive ensemble, chamber, and solo experience. She has been a member of the Eastman Saxophone Project, the Eastman Wind Ensemble, and Musica Nova. She has also garnered top prizes at numerous local, regional, and national solo and chamber music competitions.

At the Yale School of Music, Venturino is Assistant Professor, Adjunct, of Music Analysis and Musicianship. A dynamic and innovative teacher, Venturino is a recipient of the University of Rochester’s Educational IT Innovation Grant, Eastman’s TA Prize for Excellence in Teaching, and the Eastman Community Music School’s Jack L. Frank Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Venturino holds a bachelor of music degree in music theory and a bachelor of music degree and a performer’s certificate in classical saxophone performance from the Eastman School of Music, where her dissertation—on the concept of resonance in French music and music theory from 1900 to 1960—was supported by the University of Rochester’s Raymond N. Ball Fellowship